air leak syndrome

air leak syndrome

A condition characterised by alveolar or airway rupture into the pulmonary interstitium, typically accompanied by escape of air into regional tissues, including the pleura, mediastinum, subcutaneous tissues or abdominal cavity; it is more common in children.

Aetiology
Overdistention of lungs, uneven ventilation, chemical injury, trauma, Valsalva manoeuvre, idiopathic (spontaneous).

Predisposing factors
Respiratory distress syndrome, immaturity of lungs, positive pressure ventilation, foetal distress/asphyxia, botched intubation, atelectasis, resuscitation, tracheal suctioning, pneumonia including aspiration pneumonia.
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Objectives: To determine the frequency of complications like air leak syndrome and persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPHN) in neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome in Children Hospital Lahore.
Similarly air leak syndrome was diagnosed if a neonate with MAS having decreased air entry on one or both sides of chest and supported by x-ray chest having lung collapse and tracheal daviation.
Frequencies and percentages were given for qualitative variables like air leak syndrome and pulmonary hypertension.
The CT revealed air leak syndrome including massive bilateralpneumothoraxpneumopericardium pneumomediastinumpneumoretroperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema (Fig.
Cardic shock and anoxia attack owing to tension pneumopericardium could be responsible for unsuccessful resuscitation so a high index of suspicion of air leak syndrome is required during intrahospital transportation with portable ventilator especially any oxygen saturation drop.
All the clinical types of air leak syndrome originate in over distended alveoli, which ultimately rupture.
Pneumopericardium: Usually associated with other air leak syndrome and occurs in babies on high ventilator settings.
DISCUSSION: Air leak syndromes are a group of clinically recognizable disorder produced by alveolar rupture and subsequent escape of air in to the tissue in which air is not normally present.
of the District of Columbia) includes information and illustrations on acute and infant respiratory distress syndromes, asthma, chronic lung disease of the newborn, cystic fibrosis, upper airway inflammatory diseases, bronchiolitis, air leak syndromes, congenital heart disease, and neuromuscular diseases, including how to adapt equipment to neonate or pediatric patients.