ague

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a·gue

(ā'gū), Avoid the mispronunciation āg.
1. Malarial fever.
2. A chill.
[Fr. aigu, acute]

ague

(a´gu)
1. a chill.
2. old name for malaria.

ague

(ā′gyo͞o)
n.
1. A febrile condition in which there are alternating periods of chills, fever, and sweating. Used chiefly in reference to the fevers associated with malaria.
2. A chill or fit of shivering.

a′gu·ish (ā′gyo͞o-ĭsh) adj.
a′gu·ish·ly adv.
a′gu·ish·ness n.

ague

(1) Malarial fever. 
(2) An obsolete, nonspecific term for "a chill".
(3) An obsolete, nonspecific term for a localised pain.

a·gue

(ā'gyū)
An intermittent fever.
[Fr. aigu, acute]

ague

A burning fever with hot and cold spells and severe shivering or rigor when the temperature is rising, as is experienced in MALARIA.

a·gue

(ā'gyū) Avoid the mispronunciation āg.
1. Malarial fever.
2. A chill.
[Fr. aigu, acute]
References in periodicals archive ?
The French labeled it "fieve aigue," owing to its connection with fever and chills, while the English simply called it "the ague.
Still others suffered from what was called the ague.
While sufferers gained some immunity, they were always subject to a new bout of the ague when next visited by a carrier mosquito.
A man whose family settled in Michigan when he was a child recalled: "My father shook with the ague every day for eighteen months; there were ten all down at once, my mother, the only one able to administer the cup of cold water and care for the sick.
John Sappington's Anti-Fever and Ague Pills' with the help of traveling salesmen.
This was widely perceived to be the actual cause of agues in salt marsh areas--Shakespeare's "unwholesome fens"--hence the Italian term mala aria (bad air).
Nearly all the vicars of coastal "marsh parishes" answered no to the first question (Dobson lists 28 such parishes from the counties of Essex and Kent), and gave reasons such as "the place is so very Agueish," "frequently taken with agues and fevers," "the Thames having a very foul shore in this parish .
Nevertheless, agues were not restricted to the warmer years.
agues (especially quartans) appear early as about midsummer, then autumn proves very sickly.
I met Agues around 1987, and because we shared the same outlook on life, I thought we could try writing together.
If water is squeezed that quickly out of crystals 10 to 20 kilometers below the surface, it soon fills pores in the rock and is left with nowhere to go, Ague says.
If the fault seals up after an earthquake, the reactions keep going and fluid pressure builds up again," Ague says, "so this process could happen over and over.