agrimony


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agrimony

an herb found in Asia, Europe, and the United States.
uses Agrimony is used for mild diarrhea, gastroenteritis, intestinal secretion of mucus, inflammation of the mouth and throat, cuts and scrapes, and amenorrhea. There is insufficient reliable information to assess its effectiveness.
contraindications Agrimony is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity to it or to roses.

Agrimony

An herb with a high content of tannin; it is anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, astringent, haemostatic, and is a GI tonic. It is used for athlete’s foot, diarrhoea, gastric ulcers, colitis, gallstones, cirrhosis, renal disease, and to decrease uric acid levels in gout.
Note: There are no peer-reviewed data regarding efficacy or safe or effective dose; its safety and efficacy in pregnancy is unknown. It can cause photodermatitis.

ag·ri·mo·ny

(ag'ri-mō-nē)
A perennial herb (Agrimonia eupatoria, A. herba) used in desiccated form in tablets and infusions, as well as topically (wound healing, astringent).
Synonym(s): cocklebur (1) , sticklewort.
[L. agrimonia, fr. G. argemōnē]

agrimony,

n Latin names:
Agrimonia eupatoria, Agrimonia pilosa var.,
Agrimonia japonica; parts used: stems, leaves, buds; uses: hemostatic, sore throat, cuts, abrasions, cancer, (other claims: antiasthmatic, antiinflammatory, sedative, decongestant, diuretic); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, can cause flushing, palpitations, rash, photosensitivity, and photodermatitis. Also called
church steeples, cocklebur,
langyacao, liverwort, longyacao, philanthropos, potter's piletabs, sticklewort, or
stickwort.
Enlarge picture
Agrimony.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was a riot of colour full of humming bees and insects, now it's tidy but silent; all the fluffy pink agrimony has gone as have the Shasta daisies and the bindweed that clung to the railings like a drunk to a lamppost but at least they've left the beautiful buddleia and the strange spires of bear's breeches.
RGAOMIYN: AGRIMONY RASPAAAILLR: SARSAPARILLA EELNTT: NETTLE ROWYAR: YARROW NIATNAPL: PLANTAIN GRLCAI: GARLIC COKYHHLLO: HOLLYHOCK EWDEIPG: PIGWEED AMHCMOLIE: CHAMOMILE DKCOUBR: BURDOCK DLIW GNGEIR: WILD GINGER HSPEHEDR'S RUPSE: SHEPHERD'S PURSE HCICROY: CHICORY EESTNOB: BONESET IDLW RTSBWARERY: WILD STRAWBERRY TS.
In this updated translation of the German edition titled Arzneidrogenprofile (2000), German pharmacists and a naturopath profile some 200 commonly used medicinal herbs, from agrimony to zedoary.
Examples include gorse for feelings of hopelessness, clematis for people who are unable to live in the present and fantasise about having a child, and agrimony for people who feel inner turmoil but pretend to the world that all is well.
It's been of great benefit to wildlife, with species such as lesser knapweed, agrimony, wild angelica and unusual trailing tormentil providing a colourful backdrop to a pleasant day's golf.
COUGH REMEDY Bruise agrimony in a mortar and mix the juice with boiling milk, strain and use.
In the woods and pastures, you can find tall ironweed, wingstem, wild oxeye, small-flowered agrimony, tall bellflower, white snakeroot, wild lettuce, sundrops, heal-all, wild cucumber, jumpseed, tall coneflower, clearweed, touch-me-not and goldenrod.
Some might be thought too weed-like for gardens but vetches, clovers, knapweed, teasel, field scabious, hemp agrimony, lady's smock and mallow make an impressive wild garden collection.
Agrimony or raspberry leaves are astringent so will tone up the intestinal membrane, while chamomile and meadowsweet are both healing and will reduce inflammation.
Crab apple can make you feel much more positive about the way you look, while agrimony is recommended if you're the sort of person who puts on a cheerful face to everyone else then goes home and raids the biscuit tin when you're alone.
The abundant plant life includes agrimony, Dyer's greenweed, St John's wort, adder's-tongue fern, cowslip and common twayblade, as well as early purple orchid, common spotted orchid, bee orchid, and greater butterfly orchid, which occur in glades in the scrub.