agnostic

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agnostic

Neurology
adjective Suffering from agnosia.
 
Vox populi
noun A person who does not subscribe to a formal system of beliefs or religion.

agnostic

(ag-nos′tik) [G. agnōstos, unknown, not capable of being known + -ic]
Uncertain or doubtful of the ability to prove the existence of something, but esp. of God.
agnosticagnosticism (tĭ-sĭzm)
References in periodicals archive ?
I know her stubbornness has other causes, including pleasing family members who are deeply religious and have always resented my father's agnosticism.
The leading mobile app platforms will be characterized by open and extensible architectures, an API management and data orchestration layer, extensive developer libraries, agnosticism to tools, infrastructures and standards, integrated testing and analytics and a rich ecosystem.
The book is being aggressively promoted to appropriate markets with a focus on the religion and agnosticism categories.
After a chronology and a brief definition and explanation of atheism and agnosticism, the selections are organized chronologically from the ancient world to the 20th century, with additional sections on humorists and contemporary voices of the period 1998-2009.
Stephen Jay Gould, Alistair McGrath) to illustrate the flawed thinking of concepts of agnosticism and atheism.
In another sense, the book quietly advances a position favored by the author, namely religious naturalism or serious agnosticism.
In particular, it argues that on certain popular views about the nature of belief, it is impossible to adopt the nearly global agnosticism recommended by the skeptical epistemologist.
Features such as hypervisor agnosticism will supply the flexibility end-users are looking for and allows them to sidestep any issues of vendor lock-in,"
I appreciate especially his telling of his pilgrimage from a fundamentalist upbringing to his present agnosticism.
DIVINITY OF DOUBT: THE GOD QUESTION provides a moving survey from the nation's foremost prosecutor and makes a case for agnosticism.
Given that we are not in a position to come to know the truth-status of vague sentences, agnosticism seems to be the only consistent view concerning the problem of vagueness, at least according to Rosenkranz's account.
This region is very diversified not in races but also in beliefs comprising believers of Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity, Agnosticism and Atheism.