agnosia


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agnosia

 [ag-no´zhah]
inability to recognize the import of sensory impressions; the varieties correspond with several senses and are distinguished as auditory (acoustic), gustatory, olfactory, tactile, and visual.
finger agnosia loss of ability to indicate one's own or another's fingers.
tactile agnosia inability to recognize familiar objects by touch. See also astereognosis.
time agnosia loss of comprehension of the succession and duration of events.
visual agnosia inability to recognize familiar objects by sight, usually due to a lesion in one of the visual association areas. Called also object blindness and psychic blindness.
visual-spatial agnosia (visuospatial agnosia) lack of the ability to analyze and orient using visual representations and their spatial relationships.

ag·no·si·a

(ag-nō'zē-ă),
Impairment of the ability to recognize, or comprehend the meaning of, various sensory stimuli, not attributable to disorders of the primary receptors or general intellect; agnosias are receptive defects caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum.
Synonym(s): agnea
[G. ignorance; from a- priv. + gnōsis, knowledge]

agnosia

/ag·no·sia/ (ag-no´zhah) inability to recognize the import of sensory impressions; the varieties correspond with several senses and are distinguished as auditory (acoustic), gustatory, olfactory, tactile, and visual.
face agnosia , facial agnosia prosopagnosia.
finger agnosia  loss of ability to indicate one's own or another's fingers.
time agnosia  loss of comprehension of the succession and duration of events.
visual agnosia  inability to recognize familiar objects by sight, usually due to a lesion in one of the visual association areas.

agnosia

(ăg-nō′zhə)
n.
Loss of the ability to interpret sensory stimuli, such as sounds or images.

agnosia

[ag·nō′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a + gnosis, not knowledge
total or partial loss of the ability to recognize familiar objects or persons through sensory stimuli as a result of organic brain damage or dementia. The condition may affect any of the senses and is classified accordingly as auditory, visual, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile agnosia. Also called agnosis. See also autotopagnosia.

Agnosia

An inability to recognise sensory stimuli (objects, people, sounds, shapes or smells) in absence of a destruction of neural pathways. Agnosias are common in parietal lobe tumours, and are classified according to the sense affected—e.g., touch (tactile agnosia), hearing (auditory agnosia), sight (visual agnosia), smell (olfactory agnosia), or taste (gustatory agnosia).

agnosia

Neurology An inability to recognize sensory stimuli–objects, people, sounds, shapes or smells, common in parietal lobe tumors; agnosias are classified according to the sense affected–eg, touch–tactile agnosia, hearing—auditory agnosia, sight—visual agnosia, smell–olfactory agnosia, taste–gustatory agnosia. See Gustatory agnosia, Spatial agnosia, Visual agnosia.

ag·no·si·a

(ag-nō'zē-ă)
Impairment of ability to recognize, or comprehend the meaning of, various sensory stimuli, not attributable to disorders of the primary receptors or general intellect; receptive defects caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum.
[G. ignorance; from a- priv. + gnōsis, knowledge]

agnosia

A disorder of the ‘association’ areas of the brain, in which the person cannot correctly interpret sensory input. Agnosia commonly follows STROKE.

agnosia 

Inability to recognize the import of sensory stimuli (e.g. to recognize colour, faces, shape and the orientation of objects), although the receptors and the sensory pathway are intact. The condition is attributed to bilateral lesions in the association areas of the cortex. If the sense of sight is affected, it is called visual agnosia (perceptual or psychic blindness). See alexia; optical apraxia; prosopagnosia.

agnosia (agnō´zēə, -zhə),

n a loss of ability to recognize common objects (that is, a loss of ability to understand the significance of sensory stimuli e.g., tactile, auditory, or visual] resulting from brain damage).
References in periodicals archive ?
In the neuropsychological evaluation, severe cognitive deficits were found: apperceptive visual agnosia, spatial agnosia, constructional apraxia, ideomotor apraxia and a significant alteration in coding and recovery of verbal episodic memory.
In contrast to the phantoms with which many of us are more familiar, such as painful sensations at the site of a missing limb, agnosia is best described as "the nonrecognition of a part of the body as one's own.
Nineteen experiments on a person with visual object agnosia and dyslexia but normal face recognition.
Amusia due to rhythm agnosia in a musician with LHD: a nonauditory supramodal defect.
While AD is characterised by memory impairment, VaD is characterised by executive dysfunction and behavioural psychological symptoms such as apathy, lack of motivation, agnosia, opposition, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts.
Given the distribution of the cortical abnormalities, salient clinical characteristics of these disorders include profound alterations in personality and social conduct, agnosia, and impulsivity.
Los datos y las reglas son las potencialidades restrictivas con las cuales estamos dinamicamente embebidos en el mundo, en la medida en que la anarquia (la ausencia de normas o reglas) puede ser vista como la contraparte del fenomeno de falta de sentido en los datos (la ausencia de cualquier distincion o diferencias), dando lugar a un tipo de agnosia (falta de percepcion de los datos o las reglas porque no hay ninguno).
Now neuroscientists from Carnegie Mellon University and Princeton University examined the brain of a person with object agnosia, a deficit in the ability to recognize objects that does not include damage to the eyes or a general loss in intelligence, and have uncovered the neural mechanisms of object recognition.
Joanna Parts (Barbara Goenaga) suffers from rare condition called agnosia, which means her brain can't interpret the stimuli from her eyes and ears.
AGNOSIA (Cert 15, 105 mins) JOANA Parts (Barbara Goenaga) suffers from a rare neurophysiological condition called agnosia, which means that while her eyes and ears are in perfect condition, her brain cannot correctly interpret the stimuli.
development of multiple cognitive deficits manifested by memory impairment, word finding difficulty, and at least one of the following cognitive disturbances: aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, and disturbance in executive functioning.
Symptoms may be suggestive of a mass lesion and include fever, headache, memory loss, mental confusion, aphasia, agnosia, apraxia, seizures, sensory deficits, and visual field defects.