agnosia


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Related to agnosia: visual agnosia, anosognosia, Finger agnosia

agnosia

 [ag-no´zhah]
inability to recognize the import of sensory impressions; the varieties correspond with several senses and are distinguished as auditory (acoustic), gustatory, olfactory, tactile, and visual.
finger agnosia loss of ability to indicate one's own or another's fingers.
tactile agnosia inability to recognize familiar objects by touch. See also astereognosis.
time agnosia loss of comprehension of the succession and duration of events.
visual agnosia inability to recognize familiar objects by sight, usually due to a lesion in one of the visual association areas. Called also object blindness and psychic blindness.
visual-spatial agnosia (visuospatial agnosia) lack of the ability to analyze and orient using visual representations and their spatial relationships.

ag·no·si·a

(ag-nō'zē-ă),
Impairment of the ability to recognize, or comprehend the meaning of, various sensory stimuli, not attributable to disorders of the primary receptors or general intellect; agnosias are receptive defects caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum.
Synonym(s): agnea
[G. ignorance; from a- priv. + gnōsis, knowledge]

agnosia

/ag·no·sia/ (ag-no´zhah) inability to recognize the import of sensory impressions; the varieties correspond with several senses and are distinguished as auditory (acoustic), gustatory, olfactory, tactile, and visual.
face agnosia , facial agnosia prosopagnosia.
finger agnosia  loss of ability to indicate one's own or another's fingers.
time agnosia  loss of comprehension of the succession and duration of events.
visual agnosia  inability to recognize familiar objects by sight, usually due to a lesion in one of the visual association areas.

agnosia

(ăg-nō′zhə)
n.
Loss of the ability to interpret sensory stimuli, such as sounds or images.

agnosia

[ag·nō′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a + gnosis, not knowledge
total or partial loss of the ability to recognize familiar objects or persons through sensory stimuli as a result of organic brain damage or dementia. The condition may affect any of the senses and is classified accordingly as auditory, visual, olfactory, gustatory, or tactile agnosia. Also called agnosis. See also autotopagnosia.

Agnosia

An inability to recognise sensory stimuli (objects, people, sounds, shapes or smells) in absence of a destruction of neural pathways. Agnosias are common in parietal lobe tumours, and are classified according to the sense affected—e.g., touch (tactile agnosia), hearing (auditory agnosia), sight (visual agnosia), smell (olfactory agnosia), or taste (gustatory agnosia).

agnosia

Neurology An inability to recognize sensory stimuli–objects, people, sounds, shapes or smells, common in parietal lobe tumors; agnosias are classified according to the sense affected–eg, touch–tactile agnosia, hearing—auditory agnosia, sight—visual agnosia, smell–olfactory agnosia, taste–gustatory agnosia. See Gustatory agnosia, Spatial agnosia, Visual agnosia.

ag·no·si·a

(ag-nō'zē-ă)
Impairment of ability to recognize, or comprehend the meaning of, various sensory stimuli, not attributable to disorders of the primary receptors or general intellect; receptive defects caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum.
[G. ignorance; from a- priv. + gnōsis, knowledge]

agnosia

A disorder of the ‘association’ areas of the brain, in which the person cannot correctly interpret sensory input. Agnosia commonly follows STROKE.

agnosia 

Inability to recognize the import of sensory stimuli (e.g. to recognize colour, faces, shape and the orientation of objects), although the receptors and the sensory pathway are intact. The condition is attributed to bilateral lesions in the association areas of the cortex. If the sense of sight is affected, it is called visual agnosia (perceptual or psychic blindness). See alexia; optical apraxia; prosopagnosia.

agnosia (agnō´zēə, -zhə),

n a loss of ability to recognize common objects (that is, a loss of ability to understand the significance of sensory stimuli e.g., tactile, auditory, or visual] resulting from brain damage).
References in periodicals archive ?
To gain new insight into the neural basis of object recognition, the research team used neuroimaging and behavioural investigations to study visual and object-selective responses in the cortex of healthy controls and a participant called SM who, following selective brain damage to the right hemisphere of the brain, exhibited object agnosia.
Apraxia and agnosia are well documented in individuals with stroke and severe TBI, and symptoms are usually overt and relatively easy to detect.
Vinpocetine was highly effective in the 15-30 mg/day dose range in these patients in the parameters measured (Sandoz Clinical Assessment Geriatric Scale, Mini Mental State Questionnaire, Clinical Global Impression, Life Satisfaction Scale, dysarthria, agnosia, etc.
4) According to the American Psychiatric Association's DSM-IV, the diagnostic features of AD include impairment in memory, aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, and a disturbance in executive function.
Summary: I am suffering from a total state of agnosia.
In the early twentieth century, research on the biology of perception followed two basic approaches: agnosia studies that located different aspects of visual processing in the brain according to individual injuries and perceptual psychology experiments that isolated visual elements such as parallel lines (gratings) and color squares.
There are initial memory problems and later development of aphasia (language deterioration), apraxia (impaired motor function ability despite intact motor ability), agnosia (loss of ability to identify objects) and disturbances in executive functioning (as demonstrated in problems related to abstract thought and the management of complex behaviour).
He knows that difficulty as such, along with its cortege of problems and questions, is not a de facto state of affairs but a de jure structure of thought; that there is an acephalism in thought, just as there is an amnesia in memory, an aphasia in language and an agnosia in sensibility.
We can see the relevance of the mechanisms to objective time as manifest in the brain within certain cortical regions, but we cannot tie these (mechanisms) to the subjective feeling of time, as exemplified in the case of individuals suffering from time agnosia : the comprehension of time is altogether lost, although most normal mental processes may still function nevertheless.
AD is a chronic progressive disease characterized by memory loss and deficits in one or more of the following cognitive domains: aphasia (language disturbance), agnosia (failure to recognize people or objects in presence of intact sensory function), apraxia (inability to perform motor acts in presence of intact motor system), or executive function (plan, organize, sequence actions, or form abstractions).
5) And recent work on facial agnosia, the absence or loss of the ability to remember and recognize faces, indicates that the way we recognize faces in general is separate from the way we recognize individual faces.
Clinically, Alzheimer's disease manifests as an insidious memory impairment, with other possible symptoms including aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, and disturbances in executive functioning (APA, 2000).