agitation


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agitation

 [aj″ĭ-ta´shun]
extreme restlessness, as manifested in depression and other mental disorders. Called also psychomotor agitation.

agitation

/ag·i·ta·tion/ (aj″ĭ-ta´shun) excessive, purposeless cognitive and motor activity or restlessness, usually associated with a state of tension or anxiety. Called also psychomotor a.

agitation

a state of chronic restlessness and increased psychomotor activity generally observed as an expression of emotional tension and characterized by purposeless, restless activity. Pacing, talking, crying, and laughing sometimes are characteristic and may serve to release nervous tension associated with anxiety, fear, or other mental stress. agitate, v.

agitation

Neurology A state of restless anxiety Clinical ↑ nonpurposeful motor activity, usually associated with internal tension–eg, ants in pants, fidgeting, pacing, pulling of clothes

agitation

A state of mind, usually due to anxiety or tension, which causes obvious restlessness.

agitation,

n 1. the shaking of a substance, either for mixing ingredients or to remove debris or buildup from an object within the substance, such as a removable oral prosthetic.
2. the intentional, usually mild, disturbance of the skin, mucosa, or other surface (e.g., with a wooden interdental cleaner or probe instrument) to determine if infection or disease is present. If agitated surfaces bruise or bleed easily, or are otherwise disrupted (e.g., develop a lesion), the presence of a pathologic condition should be suspected.
3. a psychosomatic condition represented by uncontrollable or excessive body movements. The psychologic aspect may often indicate the presence of unresolved stress.

Patient discussion about agitation

Q. i have restless legs at night . could someone help me with what meds i should take

A. I suffered badly from RLS for several years. I then went to see a Neurologist about it. He prescribed a medication for the RLS, and within days the problem was gone. The sense of relief was amazing. However, one has to take the medicine all the time - if I forget to take mine, then the symptoms come back. Nevertheless, it is great to be completely free of the problem !

More discussions about agitation
References in classic literature ?
So great is the terror with which even now our Aristocracy looks back to the far-distant days of the agitation for the Universal Colour Bill.
By not one of the circle was he listened to with such unbroken, unalloyed enjoyment as by his wife, who was really extremely happy to see him, and whose feelings were so warmed by his sudden arrival as to place her nearer agitation than she had been for the last twenty years.
Come, Monsieur d'Artagnan," continued Louis, with feverish agitation, "ought you not to be as patient as I am?
Had Lady Dalrymple and her daughter even been very agreeable, she would still have been ashamed of the agitation they created, but they were nothing.
As a rule she was so calm; her agitation now was amazing.
The prince was listening open-mouthed, and still in a condition of excited agitation.
I must inquire," said Aramis, suddenly, and with great agitation.
On their familiar faces he read agitation and alarm.
Such symptoms of agitation as he might perceive (and they had left their tokens in brightness of eye and pallor of cheeks) seemed to him well befitting the actors in so great a drama as that of Katharine Hilbery's daily life.
Yes--careful against mental agitation of all kinds, and against excessive application.
Miss Jethro laid aside the Handbill without any visible appearance of agitation.
A sudden movement, an agitation of the entire company front, as from an electric shock, attested the startling character of the incident.