aggressive periodontitis


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aggressive periodontitis

the rapid destruction of the clinical periodontal attachment and the bone surrounding the tooth or teeth. It can occur localized or generalized in an otherwise clinically healthy patient but with probable selective immune dysfunction. Currently, no association between aggressive periodontitis and oral hygiene has been established. Formerly classified as early onset periodontitis, juvenile periodontitis, or localized juvenile periodontitis.

aggressive periodontitis

Abbreviation: AgP
Periodontitis in which alveolar bone loss and ligament failure occur rapidly, resulting in dental mobility and sometimes exfoliation (loss of teeth). The disease often begins in adolescence and may cluster in families. Synonym: generalized progressive periodontitis
See also: periodontitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggregatibacterium actinomycetemcomitans is detected in our study more in aggressive periodontitis (7.
In our study, Eubacterium is present in aggressive periodontitis (5.
Clinical Criteria Assigned to Periodontal Case Types of Health, Gingivitis, Chronic Periodontitis (slight, moderate, and severe), and Aggressive Periodontitis.
Based on the clinical and radiographic findings showing tooth mobility and attachment loss at more than 30% of sites in the mouth [Wiebe and Putnins, 2000], the patient was diagnosed as having generalised aggressive periodontitis (GAP).
Based on the literature, reports have shown that aggressive periodontitis can occur in the absence of detectable neutrophil defects [Lopez, 1992; Bodur et al.
Neutrophil dysfunction and familial distribution are common in both forms of aggressive periodontitis.
A recent association between hypophosphataemic rickets and aggressive periodontitis has been described.
The boy described herein is the first case report in the literature of a patient with HR and aggressive periodontitis.
The periodontal findings in this case are unique, teeth were lost due to excessive mobility mimicking aggressive periodontitis, however, periodontal and radiographic examination revealed that both attachment levels and crestal bone heights are not those characteristic of aggressive periodontitis where severe bone and attachment loss are the most common features.
In view of the aggressive periodontitis [Hart and Shapira, 1994], and reports of increased susceptibility to infections in patients with PLS [Almuneef et al.

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