aggregate

(redirected from aggregative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

aggregate

 [ag´rĕ-gat]
individuals, families, or other groupings who are associated because of similar social, personal, health care, or other needs or interests.

ag·gre·gate

(ag'rĕ-gāt),
1. To unite or come together in a mass or cluster.
2. The total of individual units making up a mass or cluster.
[L. ag-grego, pp. -atus, to add to, fr. grex (greg-), a flock]

aggregate

/ag·gre·gate/
1. (ag´rĕ-gāt) to crowd or cluster together.
2. (ag´rĕ-git) crowded or clustered together.
3. (ag´rĕ-git) a mass or assemblage.

aggregate

[ag′rəgāt]
Etymology: L, ad + gregare, to gather together
1 the total of a group of substances or components making up a mass or complex. Data on individual patients can be aggregated to allow conclusions about the patient population to be made.
2 See aggregation.

Aggregate

Epidemiology A group of persons who share one or more traits or characteristics without necessarily having had any direct social connection.
Examples All female doctors; all European cities with populations over 20,000; all coal miners.
Zoology A group of species within a genus, but not a subgenus; a group of subspecies, often written within brackets.

ag·gre·gate

(ag'rĕ-gāt)
1. To unite or come together in a mass or cluster.
2. The total of individual units making up a mass or cluster.
[L. ag-grego, pp. -atus, to add to, fr. grex (greg-), a flock]
References in periodicals archive ?
we restrict our problem to the class of aggregative functions.
In addition, I would like to pose the question of whether we should understand exercises of the popular initiative in aggregative or deliberative terms.
What we are calling the philosophical and nonphilosophical forms of the aggregative conception of democracy differ in both their moral and their epistemic premises (which are related).
Modifiable Components of Aggregative Ethics, and Adequacy Criteria
In many domains, the aggregative view has considerable force.
Strains exhibiting diffuse adherence and aggregative patterns were detected more in persistent episodes; however, the differences in rates of isolation of these organisms among acute and persistent episodes were not statistically significant.
The fact that patch area (related to local population size) does not explain occupancy patterns seems to indicate that the spatial population structure is more likely to be determined by random extinction-colonization dynamics within aggregative clusters of closely connected suitable habitat remnants, which appear to be situated near the inner dune front.
But there is more to the value of individualism than simply blocking aggregative arguments.
Studies included in the book utilise two of the classical techniques for historical demographic analysis: aggregative analysis and family reconstitution.
The aggregative result of the young boy's violent act would determine his fate-there was only one serious injury and no deaths.
Nevertheless, such disappointments have not been the occasion for abandoning the aggregative approach altogether.