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aggregate

 [ag´rĕ-gat]
individuals, families, or other groupings who are associated because of similar social, personal, health care, or other needs or interests.

ag·gre·gate

(ag'rĕ-gāt),
1. To unite or come together in a mass or cluster.
2. The total of individual units making up a mass or cluster.
[L. ag-grego, pp. -atus, to add to, fr. grex (greg-), a flock]

aggregate

/ag·gre·gate/
1. (ag´rĕ-gāt) to crowd or cluster together.
2. (ag´rĕ-git) crowded or clustered together.
3. (ag´rĕ-git) a mass or assemblage.

aggregate

[ag′rəgāt]
Etymology: L, ad + gregare, to gather together
1 the total of a group of substances or components making up a mass or complex. Data on individual patients can be aggregated to allow conclusions about the patient population to be made.
2 See aggregation.

Aggregate

Epidemiology A group of persons who share one or more traits or characteristics without necessarily having had any direct social connection.
Examples All female doctors; all European cities with populations over 20,000; all coal miners.
Zoology A group of species within a genus, but not a subgenus; a group of subspecies, often written within brackets.

ag·gre·gate

(ag'rĕ-gāt)
1. To unite or come together in a mass or cluster.
2. The total of individual units making up a mass or cluster.
[L. ag-grego, pp. -atus, to add to, fr. grex (greg-), a flock]
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the university reports all degrees in education aggregately, without regard to major field, level, or specialization, this paper follows that practice.
Most of these distinctively religious universities are in cities with exceptionally high costs of living, and the effects of these differences are much larger when the school is assessed individually rather than for all private schools aggregately.
But aggregately, during the crises of the late 1960s, the faculty was able to act only in a manner that undercut their president.
In addition, demographics (age, race, sex) and comorbidity data were trended aggregately as an aside to demonstrate the different kinds of data available to the M+COs and other health care organizations.
The information in Table 2 is presented aggregately because Chi-square analyses identified no significant differences in participants' responses based on their role (e.
The developer had argued that the unsold lots should be valued aggregately using a wholesale valuation.
Aggregately, these changes should improve access, user capability, and the use of FEMS to enhance equipment maintenance.
In fact, the overall character of work within virtual work environments as well as the specific nature of some occupations could be aggregately considered as work within a virtual context.
Moreover, enhancing the CM profession aggregately will depend on the caliber of professional interested in becoming part of the profession.
That means that they want insurance risk executives that can hold their own as companies look at all their risks collectively-- and even consider creating a new job for a corporate risk officer who would manage all corporate risks aggregately.
Ozinga, who took on the Nevada BTOP directorship last year, said that in the last two years the local building trades unions "have grown aggregately by more than 7,000 members -- a 35 percent increase.

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