ageism


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ageism

[ā′jizəm]
Etymology: L, aetas, lifetime
an attitude that discriminates, separates, stigmatizes, or otherwise disadvantages older adults on the basis of chronological age.

Age Discrimination

Geriatrics A bias or belief that may be held by a health care provider that depression, forgetfulness, and other disorders are a normal part of ageing and that older individuals won’t benefit from treatment of mental disorders.
Social medicine Discrimination against or unfair treatment of individuals on the basis of their age.
Psychiatry Systematic stereotyping of and discrimination against the elderly to distance oneself from their social plight and skirt personal fears of ageing and death.
MedspeakUK Any overt or covert policy or act that adversely affects a worker because of his/her age.
MedspeakUS The Age Discrimination Act of 1975 provides that no person in the US shall, on the basis of age, be denied the benefits of, be excluded from participation in, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.

ageism

Geriatrics A bias or belief that may be held by a health care provider that depression, forgetfulness, and other disorders are a normal part of aging and that older individuals will not benefit from treatment of mental disorders. See elderly. Psychiatry Systematic stereotyping of and discrimination against the elderly to distance oneself from their social plight and skirt personal fears of aging and death. See Elder abuse. Cf Gerontophobia.

age·ism

(āj'izm)
Actions and attitudes that place different values on, or create unequal opportunities for, people or groups because of their age.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It would not be right however for Miriam to appear on every single debate about ageism across the BBC as it would risk limiting the range of voices and opinions that audiences could hear.
Did Heilbrun make a tough-minded, defensible choice because the future looked bleak or, as Gullette believes, was she afflicted by internalized ageism and consequent depression?
Other studies have found ageism among college-age individuals (Kavalar, 2001; Kite, 1996; McConatha, Schnell, Volkwein, Riley, & Leach, 2003).
And of course if we can have ageism then what about other potential isms?
SIR; I have been intrigued with the flurry of recent letters regarding ageism in the grocery industry.
You would think perhaps that in these enlightened times what is inelegantly called ageism would no longer be a burning issue--and you would be wrong to think so.
This is an outrageous example of young whippersnapper ageism.
Although Robert Butler first coined the term in 1980, few researchers subsequently have grappled with the insidious nature of ageism in our society and among professionals.
It indicates that long-term care is still emerging from its Dark Age of ageism, resident neglect and governmen t-program-inspired greed.
The author worries that campaigning against ageism - declining to decline - may sound unduly utopian.
In addition to my sex and disability, I will also face ageism (a triple whammy).
It is divided into three parts: the origins of ageism; aspects of ageism; and rethinking ageism.