agaric


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Related to agaric: fly agaric

agaric

/agar·ic/ (ah-gar´ik) (ag´ah-rik)
1. any mushroom, more especially any species of Agaricus.
2. a preparation of rotten wood mixed with fungi or dried mushrooms.

agaric

(ăg′ər-ĭk, ə-găr′ĭk)
n.
1. Any of numerous mushrooms having an umbrellalike cap with gills beneath, chiefly belonging to the order Agaricales.
2. The dried fruiting body of certain fungal species in the genus Fomes, formerly used in medicine, especially to inhibit the production of sweat.

agaric

(ag′ă-rik) (ă-gar′ik) [L. fr. Gr. agarikon, a sort of fungus]
A toxic or hallucinogenic mushroom, esp. species of the genus Agaricus.

agaric

a fungus of the family Agaricaceae which includes the common mushroom, with central stalk and a cap possessing radiating gills on the lower side.
References in periodicals archive ?
Often the dish of a mature fly agaric looks like something has been at it, but in fact it is the emergence from the membrane that causes the damage.
According to the Chinese Health Food Industry Monitoring and Marketing Research Report, the agaric polysaccharide extracted from black fungus could promote cellular and humoral immunity.
Fly agarics have been featured in paintings since the Renaissance.
Needham and Wasson accepted that the Chinese "plant of deathlessness" (pu ssu chih tshao) could be the agaric which grew under the "tree of deathlessness" or birch (pu ssu chih shu).
7 Destroying angel, death cap and fly agaric are all poisonous species of what?
CLOSE VIEW: 12-year-old Mark Cumberledge tracks down some colourful fly agaric Picture by MARK PINDER
FRUITS OF THE FOREST - Mark Cumberledge tracks down some colourful fly agaric fungus PICTURE: MARK PINDER
Siberians, for instance, really do have a history of consuming fly agaric mushrooms not only directly but also "distilled via human kidneys.
Also available are Fly Agaric mushrooms, which can trigger dream-like delirious states, and Kratom, which is dubbed the 'herbal speedball' because of its euphoric effects.
Psychoactive mushrooms, either the Santa Claus caps of fly agaric or the more commonly consumed Psilocybe cubensis, are scattered throughout the museum--a scattering that becomes, in Roxy Paine's 1997 Psilocybe Cubensis Field, at once exuberant and creepy.
Her comparisons revealed that frosty pod is also an agaric, despite the fact that it doesn't form a mushroom-type fruiting body.