agamic


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a·gam·ic

(ā-gam'ik),
Denoting nonsexual reproduction, as by fission or budding.
Synonym(s): agamous

agamic

(ā-găm′ĭk)
adj.
Occurring or reproducing without the union of male and female cells; asexual or parthenogenetic.

a·gam′i·cal·ly adv.

agamic

[āgam′ik]
reproducing asexually, without the union of gametes; asexual.

a·gam·ic

(ā-gam'ik)
Denoting nonsexual reproduction, as by fission or budding.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bisexual and agamic generations of Besbicus mirabilis (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae), and their associate insects.
The bisexual and agamic generations of Besbicus mirabilis(Hymenoptera:Cynipidae), and their associate insects.
The volume while concentrating on the four agamic temples does not explain well how these temples survived the onslaught of urban renewal and neglect of Hindu elites who would want to ignore their existence.
Are agamic temples dedicated to Muneeswaran only for Muneeswaran?
Lidova seems to overlook the fact that similar "origin" legends appear in other texts, and that other texts, which have no connection with agamic ideology, claim to be fifth Vedas as well.
Fertilization of unreduced female gametes: A technique for genetic enhancement within the Cenchrus-Pennisetum agamic complex.
Dhaky's study, "The Jina Image and the Nirgrantha Agamic and Hymnic Imagery," features an excellent account of how the image of Jina Vardhamana Mahavira (active ca.
The remaining papers in this section include Bettina Baumer's essay, "Unmanifest and Manifest Forms According to the Saivagamas," in which the author analyzes the agamic background of the three levels of meaning that Stella Kramrisch identified in her classic interpretation of the Elephanta cave: (1) avyakta (transcendent, unmanifest), linked with the linga; (2) vyaktavyakta (partly manifest, partly unmanifest), linked with the great sculpture of Sadasiva/Mahadeva; and (3) vyakta (manifest), represented by the eight sculptures of Siva in different manifestations.
The explanation most consistent with the intellectual undertaking represented by the book would probably be the one according to which Trika refers to the triad of Malini, Siddha and Namaka agamas, in view of the claim that schools based on the agamic tradition attach relatively more importance to the modes of spiritual discipline or sadhana than those based on the Vedic tradition.