after-effect


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af·ter·ef·fect

(af'ter-ĕ-fekt'),
A physical, physiologic, psychological, or emotional effect that continues after removal of a stimulus. See: flashback.

af·ter·ef·fect

, after-effect (AE) (aftĕr-ĕ-fekt)
A physical, physiologic, psychological, or emotional effect that continues after removal of a stimulus.

after-effect

A delayed effect of some physiological or psychological stimulus.

af·ter·ef·fect

, after-effect (aftĕr-ĕ-fekt)
A physical, physiologic, psychological, or emotional effect that continues after removal of a stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
European airports have had to institute extraordinary airport security procedures since the late 1970s, but when the US awoke from its deep security sleep (with the advent of 9/11) the after-effect has been that the security imbalance has become so great that it is now threatening the aviation industry on a global scale.
He believes that if he can custom design a force field to produce a desired trajectory resulting in an after-effect of adaptation, he would be showing the potential for neural rehabilitation.
The main after-effect is a watery discharge, which can last for up to 3 weeks following the ablation.
The main after-effect of the procedure is a watery discharge, which patients have experienced for up to 3 weeks following the ablation.
The question arises, whether or not inhibiting or trying to inhibit reactions on one trial leaves an after-effect in the next trial.
Maybe it's an after-effect of the infection I got from spending thirty days in a ditch.
But, as Farmer notes, "perhaps the worst after-effect of episodes of brutality is that, in general, they mark the beginning of persecution, not the end.
There were usually too many subsequent promotional activities to test for the after-effect on sales in much longer periods.
This after-effect is precisely what Chinese avant-garde literature attempts to voice.
Simmering discontent about immigration has in recent years clashed head-on with anger about falling wages - meaning that migrants themselves are often blamed for what is essentially an after-effect of the 2008 financial crash.
Be that as it may, the issue suddenly made me wonder if mistresses are the cause of the breakup of some marriages, or are they the after-effect of marriages that have long been dead?