affix


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affix

(a′fiks″) [L. affixus, fastened to]
An element attached to a word that alters its meaning, e.g., a prefix or a suffix.
References in periodicals archive ?
And only when that is present does the affix that will be provided occur.
The affix an occurs after the root in the meaning of an agent.
bar]k subtapatteh is to prevent the incorrect feminine affix as [a.
bar] (1997: 45), they analyze the compound differently to show that the upapada denoting the karman is a condition for the affix an: ((kumbha-am + kr)-su).
A third measure proposed by Baayen (1993: 192) quantifies the notion of degree of productivity in terms of the contribution of a given affix to the growth rate of the vocabulary as a whole.
Against the linguistic significance of P*, Bauer (2001:155) objects that P* "asks 'What proportion of new coinages use affix A?
The point is that, for each affix, P(N) is not constant, but is a decreasing function of N, even tending to zero
From these lists, all the occurrences of a given affix in a given subcorpus could be extracted and lemmatized, and finally made ready for type/token/hapax calculations, after an unavoidable and much time-consuming manual check.
They argue that -er saturates or binds the external argument of the verb to which the affix attaches, noting that appeal to a syntactic argument position makes it unnecessary to list a variety of thematic roles (agent, experiencer, instrument, stimulus, and so on) in the analysis of the affix: -er can take on any of the roles that the external argument of a verb can, from agent and instrument, to experiencer and stimulus.
In other words, there must be some semantic content to the affix that cannot be captured in a purely argument-structure theoretic framework, and therefore, as good as RH&L's analysis is, there seems to be still more work to be done on -er.
To date, the most comprehensive treatment of the affix -ee is Barker (1998).
Barker argues instead for a semantic analysis in which the affix -ee binds an argument of its base verb under three conditions: the argument bound by -ee must be episodically linked to the verb, by which he means roughly that the argument must be a participant in the event denoted by the verb; it must denote something sentient; and it must lack volitionality.