affinity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

affinity

 [ah-fin´ĭ-te]
1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex.

af·fin·i·ty (A),

(ă-fin'i-tē),
1. In chemistry, the force that impels certain atoms or molecules to bind to or unite with certain other atoms or molecules to form complexes or compounds; chemical attraction.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye or the selective uptake of a dye, chemical, or other substance by a tissue.
3. In psychology and psychiatry, a positive bond or relatedness between people or groups, or a person's positive regard for an object, idea, or activity; a positive cathexis.
4. In immunology, the strength of interaction between an antigen binding site and an antigenic determinant.
5. A biomolecular interaction exhibiting specificity.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

/af·fin·i·ty/ (ah-fin´ĭ-te)
1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex. Cf. avidity.

affinity

(ə-fĭn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. affini·ties
a. An attraction or force between particles or chemicals that causes them to combine.
b. The degree to which particles or chemicals are likely to combine: Hemoglobin has a high affinity for oxygen. Also called avidity.

affinity

[əfin′itē]
Etymology: L, affinis, related
the measure of the binding strength of the antigen-antibody reaction.

Affinity

(1) An inherent relationship.
(2) A special attraction for a specific element, organ, or structure.
Chemistry
(1) The intensity of a force that binds atoms in molecules; the tendency of substances to combine by a chemical reaction.
(2) The strength of noncovalent binds between two substances, as measured by the dissociation constant of the complex.
(3) The reciprocal of the dissociation constant.
Developmental biology The degree to which one substance is attracted to another.
Immunology
(1) A thermodynamic expression of the strength of the interaction between a single antigen binding site and a single antigenic determinant (and thus of the stereochemical compatibility between them), most accurately applied to interactions among simple, uniform antigenic determinants such as haptens.
(2) The sum of the strengths of multiple binding sites between an antibody and an antigen, which increased stability of the linkage, as measured by the association or affinity constant.

af·fin·i·ty

(ă-fin'i-tē)
1. chemistry The force that impels certain atoms to unite with certain others.
2. Selective staining of a tissue by a dye.
3. The strength of binding between a Fab site of an antibody and an antigenic determinant.
4. In a general sense, an attraction.
[L. affinis, neighboring, fr. ad, to, + finis, end, boundary]

affinity

The strength of binding between a receptor, such as an ANTIGEN binding site on an antibody, and a LIGAND, such as an EPITOPE on an antigen.

affinity

  1. the relationship of one organism to another in terms of its evolution.
  2. the strength of binding between molecules, for example an ANTIBODY and an ANTIGEN.

affinity

1. attraction; a tendency to seek out or unite with another object or substance.
2. in chemistry, the tendency of two substances to form strong or weak chemical bonds forming molecules or complexes.
3. in immunology, the thermodynamic bond strength of an antigen-antibody complex.

antibody affinity
the strength of the binding interaction between antigen and antibody.
drug affinity
the attraction of a particular class of receptor to a drug, at a level sufficient to give an observable reaction. Such a drug is an agonist.
affinity maturation
the increased affinity of antibody for an antigen which occurs during the course of an immune response.
References in classic literature ?
When I saw you a couple of days ago I knew in an instant that you were my affinity.
Money is not essential, but this wide affinity is, which transcends the habits of clique and caste and makes itself felt by men of all classes.
The strong men usually give some allowance even to the petulances of fashion, for that affinity they find in it.
The conjugal affection of her father and mother constituted her ideal of love- affinity, and she looked forward some day to emerging, without shock or friction, into that same quiet sweetness of existence with a loved one.
Mental telepathy, the affinity of souls pitched in the same whatever-you-call-it harmony," the steward mystified.
It is not my duty to indue facts and theories with affinity.
However, it is not really oddity nor a whim that forbids me to mingle ill-assorted colors and put together things that have no affinity, and compels me to avoid discords; it is my natural instinct as an artist.
For the rat, mark you, being a foul-living creature, hath a natural drawing or affinity for all foul things, so that the noxious humors pass from the man into the unclean beast.
In all these respects, in the muscular gizzard adapted for vegetable food, in the arched beak and fleshy nostrils, short legs and form of foot, the Tinochorus has a close affinity with quails.
If any one will but take pains to observe the variety of actions to which he is equally inclined in certain moods of mind, and those to which he is averse, he will see how deep is the chain of affinity.
Lastly, when she reflected how much she herself was to suffer, being indeed to become little less than a sacrifice, or a martyr, to filial love and duty, she felt an agreeable tickling in a certain little passion, which though it bears no immediate affinity either to religion or virtue, is often so kind as to lend great assistance in executing the purposes of both.
Both bear a strong affinity to the discussions of other celebrated bodies; and, as it is always interesting to trace a resemblance between the proceedings of great men, we transfer the entry to these pages.