affinal


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affinal

adjective An antiquated term, referring to an interpersonal relationship resulting from marriage; related by marriage; non-sanguineous.
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It is these more restricted marriage networks, characterised by a high concentration of cross-cutting affinal ties, that we are concerned with here.
Separating the dead: the ritual transformation of affinal exchange in central Flores.
However, the Ngaranyin practised matrilateral parallel cousin marriage which engenders a different complex of affinal relationships when compared with the Top End where rules do not identify preferred spouses.
Indeed, many seemed to have returned to their natal village and even remarried there when their husband died or the marriage failed in their affinal community (Juillerat 1996: 295).
A MB marries a FZ and their offspring are cross-cousins and fall into the affinal category.
The logic of traditional Yagwoia homosexual practices fundamentally articulates the brotherhood of men constituted outside the sphere of female and hence affinal mediation (see Mimica 1991).
A tension between affinal and blood relations is present in the man's contention that the woman should accept the identity of the "dog" because the animal was given to the man by his brother.
Family histories and extended genealogies thus reflect complex patterns of close-knit kinship ties through affinal connections and attest to the clannish nature of Nam Long villages.
It might interest you to know (or not) that all cousins are consanguineal relatives; that is, they are not related to each other through marriage, as are affinal relatives--and the closest related cousins (now this is where it really gets interesting) are double cousins, the parents of one being brother and sister of the parents of the other.
In chapter12, the authors attempted to know the level of solidarity among different religious groups, linguistic groups, affinal kin & groups of social identity, among the transplanted migrant villagers in the Andaman Islands.
Access to quarries was open to all adult males of the land-holding clan and also to other affinal male kin (that is, usually males of adjoining clans).
Lewis-Williams echoes Hewitt in his discussion of the horizontal axis, and also follows Levi-Strauss in stating that "the myth presents both a denial and an assertion of affinal relationships and concomitant responsibilities" (134).