affidavit

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affidavit

[af′idā′vit]
Etymology: L, he has pledged
a written statement that is sworn to before a notary public or an officer of the court.

Affidavit

Deposition; a pledge, oath, or statement by a person about certain facts, which is written and sworn to in the presence of a person authorised to administer such an oath, such as a notary public (US).

affidavit

Forensic medicine Deposition; a sworn pledge, oath, or statement by a person about certain facts. See testimony.

affidavit

(af″ĭ-dā′vit) [L. affidare, to swear an oath]
A voluntary written or printed statement submitted to an officer of the court and whose truthfulness is asserted by an oath or affirmation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hausner's knowledge about the background of affiants on whose statements he was prepared to rely seems to have been quite sketchy.
The Crady court granted summary judgment where the only affidavit offered in opposition to summary judgment was the affidavit shown to be a sham by the contradictory reply affidavit from the same affiant.
The views of MacDonald, who also served as an affiant for Bedford, are echoed by other expert witnesses including: Dr.
availability of separate affidavits, sworn statements or declarations to be used when one affiant does not have requisite personal knowledge of all required information;
The district court found that this statement was made with "reckless disregard for the truth," (116) despite the fact that the affiant believed the statement.
of the affiant as well as the actions of the officers who execute the
Sturgis also makes it clear that an affidavit of merit signed by a nurse is valid even if the nurse is not qualified as an expert for causation because "the issue whether the plaintiff's affiant can substantively attest or address matters of causation is not a concern for the purposes of the 'first stage' of the litigation in which an affidavit of merit must be filed under Michigan law; rather the issue can be pursued in later proceeding such as at trial.
determines that "the affiant had reasonable grounds at the time of
After a telephone conversation with the warrant affiant, Ceballos presented his supervisors with a second memorandum that was again critical of the sheriff's department's handling of this case.
The lower court agreed that a constitutional violation occurred and held that the affiant was not entitled to qualified immunity as any reasonable officer would have concluded from just a cursory look at the warrant that it was invalid.