afferent

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Related to afferent nervous system: afferent pathway

afferent

 [af´er-ent]
1. conveying toward a center; called also centripetal. See also efferent and corticipetal.
2. something that so conducts, as an afferent fiber or nerve.
afferent loop syndrome chronic partial obstruction of the proximal loop (duodenum and jejunum) after gastrojejunostomy, resulting in duodenal distention, pain, and nausea following ingestion of food.

af·fer·ent

(af'ĕr-ĕnt), Do not confuse this word with efferent. Avoid the mispronunciation ā'fe-rent, sometimes adopted to emphasize the contrast with efferent.
Inflowing; conducting toward a center, denoting certain arteries, veins, lymphatics, and nerves. Opposite of efferent.
Synonym(s): centripetal (1) , esodic
[L. afferens, fr. af-fero, to bring to]

afferent

/af·fer·ent/ (af´er-ent)
1. conveying toward a center.
2. something that so conducts, such as a fiber or nerve.

afferent

(ăf′ər-ənt)
adj.
Carrying inward to a central organ or section, as nerves that conduct impulses from the periphery of the body to the brain or spinal cord.

af′fer·ent·ly adv.

afferent

[af′ərənt]
Etymology: L, ad + ferre, to carry
proceeding toward a center, as applied to arteries, veins, lymphatic vessels, and nerves. Compare efferent.

Afferent

adjective Referring to the centripetal movement of blood or nerve impulses—e.g., through the veins toward the heart, or nerves to the brain.
noun A blood vessel or nerve that centripetally conveys flow or an impulse.

afferent

adjective
1. Conveying or transmitting.
2. Referring to the movement of blood or nerve impulses centrally–eg, through vessels toward the heart, or nerves to the brain, Cf Efferent.

af·fer·ent

(af'ĕr-ĕnt)
Inflowing; conducting toward a center, denoting certain arteries, veins, lymphatics, and nerves. Opposite of efferent
Synonym(s): centripetal (1) .
[L. afferens, fr. af-fero, to bring to]

afferent

Directed toward a central organ or part, as in the case of sensory nerves that carry impulses to the spinal cord and brain.

Afferent

Refers to peripheral nerves that transmit signals to the spinal cord and the brain. These nerves carry out sensory function.
Mentioned in: Peripheral Neuropathy

afferent

means 'going towards'. Describes nerves that carry impulses towards the central nervous system, or to relay stations outside it, from neural receptors (e.g. sensory nerves from the skin, those conveying proprioceptive information from muscles and joints or visceral afferents from internal organs). Also describes blood or lymph vessels in which flow is towards some point of reference, e.g. afferent arterioles to the glomeruli of the kidney. Opposite of efferent.

afferent 

Carrying from the periphery to the central or the main structure. See efferent.

af·fer·ent

(af'ĕr-ĕnt)
Inflowing; conducting toward a center. Opposite of efferent.
Synonym(s): centripetal (1) .
[L. afferens, fr. af-fero, to bring to]

afferent (af´ərənt),

adj conveying from a periphery to a center.
afferent impulse,
n an impulse that arises in the periphery and is carried into the central nervous system. An afferent nerve conducts the impulse from the site of origin to the central nervous system.
afferent nerves,
n.pl See nerves, afferent, in pulp. See also afferent impulse.
afferent nervous system,
n. the sensory nerves, a subdivision of the peripheral nervous system. Afferent nerves receive sensory input.

afferent

conducting toward a center or specific site of reference; incoming.

afferent arterioles
branches of the interlobular arteries of the kidney that supply the glomerular capillaries of the renal corpuscle.
afferent loop syndrome
chronic partial obstruction of the proximal loop (duodenum and jejunum) after gastrojejunostomy, resulting in duodenal distention, pain and nausea following ingestion of food.
afferent nerve
any nerve that transmits impulses from the periphery toward the central nervous system. See also neuron, afferent nerve fibers (below).
afferent nerve fibers
nerve fibers in the peripheral nervous system carrying information to the brain and spinal cord. Their cell bodies are in ganglia and their telodendria in the central nervous system.
afferent nervous activity
the number of afferent nerve fibers that are activated by the stimulus. This depends on the number of receptive fields that are included in the zone being stimulated.
afferent system
the collective sensory fibers from all parts of the body.

Patient discussion about afferent

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