affective personality

affective personality

a chronic personality disorder resulting from an enduring disturbance of mood that shapes cognition, attitude, and identity and thus colors the whole of the person's psychic life and interpersonal behavior.
See also: affective personality disorder, chronic hypomanic personality, cyclothymic personality.

af·fec·tive per·son·al·i·ty

(a-fek'tiv pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē)
A chronic behavioral pattern in an enduring disturbance of feelings or mood expressed as a form of depression and related emotional features that color the whole of the psychic life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Members have a wide range of mental health diagnoses, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, affective personality disorder and depression.
Influence of affective personality type and gender upon coping behavior, mood, and stress.
Affective personality in relation to general personality, self-reported stress, coping and optimism.
Relationship between personality characteristics and affect: Gender and affective personality.
Performance during stress: Affective personality, age, and regularity of physical exercise.
Self-reported affective personality data concerning stress have been found to be associated with affective state (Watson, Pennebaker, & Folger, 1987) and both positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA; Clark & Watson, 1988), although these scales are also correlated with other factors.
Ability to cope with stress can vary considerably as a function of optimism and affective profile; in other words, one's affective personality.
Affective personality but not depressive and anxious mood may thus be said to be predictive of the self-reported stress experience.
Taken together, the results of the psychiatric patient group and healthy control group are reconcilable with several other observations in illustrating the complex associations between affective personality, stress, energy, and dispositional optimism, not least in possibly underlying comorbidity (Palomo et al.
We focus here on a person's trait of positive affect (PA), which is his or her stable underlying affective personality (Staw, Bell, and Clausen, 1986; Watson, Clark, and Tellegen, 1988) and leads to relative consistency in affective reactions over time (Lazarus, 1991; Watson and Walker, 1996).
The more similar a group member is to others in the group in positive affective personality, the more satisfied that group member should be with the group's interpersonal relations (e.
This is especially true as teams work together over time, as team members get to know the affective personality of their peers, how each other works, and as they accommodate each other's styles through social entrainment (McGrath, 1991).