affect

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affect

 [af´ekt]
the external expression of emotion attached to ideas or mental representations of objects. see also mood.
blunted affect severe reduction in the intensity of affect; a common symptom of schizophrenic disorders.
constricted affect restricted affect.
flat affect lack of emotional expression.
inappropriate affect affect that is incongruent with the situation or with the content of a patient's ideas or speech.
labile affect that characterized by rapid changes in emotion unrelated to external events or stimuli.
restricted affect reduction in the intensity of affect, to a somewhat lesser degree than is characteristic of blunted affect.

af·fect

(af'fekt), Do not confuse this word with effect.
The emotional feeling, tone, and mood attached to a thought, including its external manifestations.
[L. affectus, state of mind, fr. afficio, to have influence on]

affect

/af·fect/ (af´ekt) the external expression of emotion attached to ideas or mental representations of objects.

affect

(ə-fĕkt′)
tr.v. af·fected, af·fecting, af·fects
To attack or infect, as a disease: Rheumatic fever can affect the heart.
n. (ăf′ĕkt′)
Feeling or emotion, especially as manifested by facial expression or body language: "The soldiers seen on television had been carefully chosen for blandness of affect" (Norman Mailer).

affect

[əfekt′]
Etymology: L, affectus, influence
an outward, observable manifestation of a person's expressed feelings or emotions, such as flat, blunted, bland, or bright. affective, adj.

Affect

(1) The observable mental or emotional state of a person. The normal range of expressed affect varies considerably between different cultures and even within the same culture.
Examples Sadness, fear, joy, anger.
Modifiers Euphoric, irritable, constricted, blunted, flat, inappropriate, labile, dramatic, sad.
(2) The subjective experience of emotion accompanying an idea or mental representation, loosely synonymous with feeling, emotion, or mood.

affect

Psychiatry
1. The observed emotional state of a Pt, which may be modified by such adjectives as blunted, dramatic, labile, sad.
2. The subjective experience of emotion accompanying an idea or mental representation; affect is loosely synonymous with feeling, emotion, or mood. See Emotion, Flat affect, Inappropriate affect, Mood.

af·fect

(a'fekt)
The emotional feeling, tone, and mood attached to a thought, including its external manifestations; especially as demonstrated by postural and facial expressions.
[L. affectus, state of mind, fr. afficio, to have influence on]

affect

Mood or emotion. The word is often used to describe the external signs of emotion, as perceived by another person.

Affect

An observed emotional expression or response. In some situations, anxiety would be considered an inappropriate affect.
Mentioned in: Anxiety

affect

in psychology, a general term for subjectively experienced feelings encompassing emotion and mood. adj affective. affective response subjectively experienced feeling in response to an environmental event. positive affect a general dimension of affect reflecting a state of enthusiasm and alertness. negative affect a general dimension of affect reflecting a state of distress, subsuming various negative moodstates including fear, anger, shame and guilt. See also circumplex model.

af·fect

(a'fekt) Do not confuse this word with effect.
The emotional feeling, tone, and mood attached to a thought, including its external manifestations.
[L. affectus, state of mind, fr. afficio, to have influence on]

affect (af´ekt),

n 1. the feeling of pleasantness or unpleasantness produced by a stimulus.
n 2. the emotional complex influencing a mental state.
n 3. the feeling experienced in connection with an emotion.

Patient discussion about affect

Q. Major mood disorder! Hi guys! My topic is all about major mood disorder, bipolar 1 mixed with psychotic features and I would like to ask if I could get some information regarding with its introduction on international, national and local. Hope you all understood what I mean to ask.

A. Methinks all these brain disorders have everything to do with a lack of copper. With all our modern technology and artificial fertilizers and processing of foods, the food has become so depleted of minerals that our bodies and brains have become so depleted that we cannot even function properly. Start taking kelp, calcium magnesium, cod liver oil, flax seed oil, and raw apple cider vinegar. This will bring healing and normal function to the brain and body systems. The emotions will calm down and be more manageable. If you are taking a vitamin with more manganese than copper it will add to the dysfunction. Don't waste your money. There you are! Some solutions rather than more rhetoric about the problem.

Q. Mood- disorder? What will happen to the people who refuse treatment? I know someone whose mother got diagnosed with "mood- disorder" and now this person says that she don't have it. But all her brothers and sisters have this, and are on medication. Is there a way to save our family heritage?

A. well done, i will start to collect with the agreement of Iri possible causes for disorders (bipolar, mood, whatever you want to call it) to help people to recognize themselves. they all can start in the moment we are in the embryo. parental conflicts, aggressions, sexual behaviours, drugs, alcohol, smoking in abondance can affect us from this moment on.

Q. I think that bipolar is just a mood disorder. I think that bipolar is just a mood disorder. Do I?

A. You are correct, according to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) Bipolar Disorder is a Mood Disorder. Other conditions in this category are Anxiety Disorders--and of course--Unipolar Depression.

More discussions about affect
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers of Thoreau will have recognized that sauntering near to heaven's gate anticipates, in turn, the paradisiacal or golden-age landscape affectingly depicted at the end of Thoreau's "Walking" (1862).
Many were affectingly willing to welcome the "refrigerator" slur because of the implicit possibility that a change in their behaviour might bring about a cure -- a rescuing thaw.
Conversely, however, it is often a quite secondary element in 'The Death of Queen Jane' and in some versions looks to have been appended, rather superfluously, to a narrative that has already been affectingly resolved through the contrast between joy at the birth of Prince Edward and sorrow at the death of Queen Jane.
It's affectingly straightforward, metronomic guitar is subtle and gentle.
The first was a growing identification, the longer he resided here, with American society and culture, a romance affectingly described in his autobiography, Hitch-22.
The representational force of an emotionally fraught, though loving, parent-child relationship affectingly celebrates poignant filial bonds rather than encouraging audiences to judge a foolish son's errors-or learn from them.
Shot in rambunctious 16mm film and accompanied by a shotgun blast of found and pre-recorded music and other sounds, Noureddine's jump-cut ridden half-hour-long postcard from Lebanon in the weeks around the 2005 assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri is daring, unsettling and -- six years on -- it remains the most affectingly smack-infused Lebanese film to emerge from Lebanon's anticlimactic "Independence Uprising.
The conclusion of the biography, with Alan Clark's final illness and death from the brain tumour which his hypochondriac fears had foretold, is managed most affectingly and brings tears to the eyes.
The final concert by the Festival Orchestra opened with Watkins' affectingly idiomatic Three Welsh Songs for String Orchestra.
Closing Time] is a fine piece of work in every respect: self-exploratory but never self-absorbed, painful and funny, affectingly open in the gratitude it expresses to father figures without whom 'I would have been sucked into the void.
Considering his subject matter - junkyards and strip mines, for example - Burtynsky's work is affectingly lyrical.
Some of these "missing" people and their histories were affectingly portrayed on another occasion during the forum, however, in Lamia Joreige's forty-minute video Un Voyage (A Journey), 2006, a multi-generational portrait of the women in the Lebanese artist's family, interwoven with photographs of her relatives in Jaffa, before their forced relocation in 1948.