adversive

adversive

/ad·ver·sive/ (ad-ver´siv) opposite; as the turning to one side in an adversive seizure.
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It has to be timely within a second or two of the initiation of barking, and it has to be adversive enough to decrease the frequency of the behavior.
Loss, trauma, and human resilience: Have we underestimated the human capacity to thrive after extremely adversive events?
There are also adpositions and case markers based on a notion of approximation ('towards'), like the versative case markers in Tsez (also called approximative, orientative, adversive, see Haspelmath [2006]).
Adversity can take many forms such as: disease, disability, societal rejection due to religion, poverty, adversive governments, war, natural disasters, persistent and unyielding weather conditions and many others.
There are two ways to reinforce voiding behavior in children: The first is giving the child a positive reinforcement--like a bite-size candy bar--as a reward for using the toilet, and the second is creating the anticipation that the child will get to leave a moderately adversive situation as soon as toileting is finished, and can then do something more fun.
The Swedish pilot study was created on the basis of a review article summarizing "that in many cases intensive psychosocial support can considerably reduce or make neuroleptic medication unnecessary with no increased risk of adversive effect.
Moreover, research has also focused on those factors that may alleviate the adversive effects of some of these job stressors.
TABLE 1 Controlling anger * Keep an anger journal * Lower baseline levels of tension * Use alternative stress-reduction strategies * Break-up adversive chain reactions * Use imagery and response rehearsal * Use effective interpersonal tools * Practice empathy * Use time out * Develop a list of coping statements that help in refraining anger-generating thinking patterns.
Efficacy expectations determine how much effort people will expend and how long they will persist in the face of obstacles and adversive experiences (Davidson & Wilson, 1973).