adverse effect


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effect

 [ĕ-fekt´]
a result produced by an action.
additive effect the combined effect produced by the action of two or more agents, being equal to the sum of their separate effects.
adverse effect a symptom produced by a drug or therapy that is injurious to the patient.
Bainbridge effect Bainbridge reflex.
Bohr effect decreased affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen caused by an increase of carbon dioxide; the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve is displaced to the right because of higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide and lower pH. See also Haldane effect.
The Bohr effect causing a shift to the right in the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve.
Crabtree effect the inhibition of oxygen consumption on the addition of glucose to tissues or microorganisms having a high rate of aerobic glycolysis; the converse of the Pasteur effect.
cumulative effect the action of a drug or treatment resulting from repeated use.
Doppler effect see doppler effect.
experimenter e's demand characteristics.
extrapyramidal e's the side effects caused by neuroleptic medications, including dystonias, parkinsonism, akathisia, and tardive dyskinesia.
Haldane effect increased oxygenation of hemoglobin promotes dissociation of carbon dioxide; see also Bohr effect.
Hawthorne effect a psychological response in which the subjects in a research study change their behavior simply because they are subjects in a study, not because of the research treatment.
heel effect variation in x-ray beam intensity and projected focal spot size along the long axis of the x-ray tube from cathode to anode.
parallax effect the position of the image on each emulsion of dual emulsion film; it is accentuated by tube-angled x-ray techniques.
Pasteur effect the decrease in the rate of glycolysis and the suppression of lactate accumulation by tissues or microorganisms in the presence of oxygen.
photoelectric effect ejection of electrons from matter as a result of interaction with photons from high frequency electromagnetic radiation, such as x-rays; the ejected electrons may be energetic enough to ionize multiple additional atoms.
placebo effect the total of all nonspecific effects, both good and adverse, of treatment; it refers primarily to psychological and psychophysiological effects associated with the caregiver-patient relationship and the patient's expectations and apprehensions concerning the treatment. See also placebo.
position effect in genetics, the changed effect produced by alteration of the relative positions of various genes on the chromosomes.
pressure effect the sum of the changes that are due to obstruction of tissue drainage by pressure.
proarrhythmic effect any new, more advanced form of arrhythmia caused by an antiarrhythmic agent, especially those that produce hemodynamically important symptoms. These arrhythmias occur less than 30 days after initiation of treatment and are not due to a new event such as acute myocardial infarction or hypokalemia.
side effect a consequence other than that for which an agent is used, especially an adverse effect on another organ system.
Somogyi effect see somogyi effect.

ad·verse ef·fect

(ad'vers e-fekt'),
a result of drug or other therapy in addition to or in extension of the desired therapeutic effect; usually but not necessarily, connoting an undesirable effect. Although technically the therapeutic effect carried beyond the desired limit (for example, a hemorrhage from an anticoagulant) is a side effect, the term more often refers to pharmacologic results of therapy unrelated to the usual objective (for example, a development of signs of Cushing syndrome with steroid therapy).
Synonym(s): side effect

Adverse Effect

Malpractice An injury caused by medical management—rather than by the underlying disease—which prolongs hospitalization, produces a disability at the time of discharge, or both.
Aetiology Drug effects, wound infections, technical complications, negligence, diagnostic or therapeutic mishaps, and events occurring in A&E.
Therapeutics An undesirable and unintended, although not necessarily unexpected, result of therapy or other intervention—e.g., headache following spinal tap or intestinal bleeding associated with aspirin therapy.
Toxicology An abnormal or harmful effect on an organism due to exposure to a chemical or noxious substance. Adverse events cause functional or anatomic damage, irreversible changes in homeostasis, or increased susceptibility to other chemical or biologic stress.
Clinical findings Change in food or liquid consumption, body or organ weight, enzyme activity, visible illness or death. Nonadverse effects usually fade when the organism is distanced from the toxin.
Trial Any undesirable symptom, occurrence or effect which a trial subject experiences during the trial, which may or may not be related to the study agent or intervention.
Examples Unfavourable and unintended reactions or findings—e.g., abnormal lab results, symptoms, or disease temporally associated with the use of a medicinal (investigational) product, whether or not it actually is related to the product.

The term adverse effect is often used interchangeably with adverse reaction, which might be better reserved for clinical phenomena occurring during drug treatment when causality cannot be or is not ascertained.

adverse effect

Pharmacotherapy An undesirable and unintended, although not necessarily unexpected, result of therapy or other intervention–eg, headache following spinal tap or intestinal bleeding associated with aspirin therapy Toxicology An abnormal or harmful effect on an organism due to exposure to a chemical or noxious substance; AEs cause functional or anatomic damage, irreversible changes in homeostasis, or ↑ an organism's susceptibility to other chemical or biologic stress Clinical Change in food or water consumption, body or organ weight, enzyme activity, visible illness or death

ad·verse ef·fect

(ad'vers e-fekt')
1. Result of drug or other therapy in addition to or in extension of the desired therapeutic effect; usually but not necessarily, connoting an undesirable effect.
2. Although technically the therapeutic effect carried beyond the desired limit (e.g., a hemorrhage from an anticoagulant) is a side effect, the term more often refers to pharmacologic results of therapy unrelated to the usual objective (e.g., a development of signs of Cushing syndrome with steroid therapy).
Synonym(s): side effect.

Patient discussion about adverse effect

Q. Will there be any adverse effect? I am planning to start on multi vitamin tablets and want to know will it be beneficial and will there be any adverse effect?

A. Yes….go ahead and have them…..keep it less initially…..slowly increase 2 then 3 then ....decrease to one per day. You will find your hair and nails beautiful. You will sleep better. It will fill your vitamin gap in nutrition and if it exceeds it will be thrown out of body.

More discussions about adverse effect
References in periodicals archive ?
Permanent hair dyes, while registering only seven notices, had the most severe adverse effects, mainly allergic in nature.
conducted a population surveillance study in six European countries to evaluate the adverse effects of both newer and older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).
Certain factors suggest that the increase in market concentration, as measured by the HHI, in the Bluefield banking market does not reflect a significantly adverse effect on competition.
The JAMA study noted that new drugs are heavily marketed to both doctors and consumers, which means they may be in wide distribution before adverse effects are known.
2002) does in fact demonstrate a majority of subjects with the perchlorate-induced effect; b) there is the potential for greater perchlorate vulnerability in pregnant women and newborns than in the general population; and c) inhibition of iodide uptake is a key step in the perchlorate toxicodynamic pathway, with moderate levels of uptake inhibition potentially sufficient to produce adverse effects in sensitive subgroups.
The Department of Justice has reviewed the proposal, including its effects on the Rocky Mount and Duplin County banking markets, and advised the Board that, in light of the proposed divestitures, consummation of the proposal likely would not have a significantly adverse effect on competition in any relevant banking market.
The Phthalate Esters Panel of the American Chemistry Council, a trade organization based in Arlington, Virginia, maintains that "there is no well-established and credible evidence for adverse effects [due to phthalates] in humans at environmentally relevant doses," says panel manager Marian Stanley.
Based on the foregoing and all the other facts of record, including the commitments made by DKB, the Board has determined that the performance of the proposed activities by DKB can reasonably be expected to produce benefits to the public that would outweigh any possible adverse effects under the proper incident to banking standard of section 4(c)(8) of the BHC Act.
In addition, based on all the facts of record, including the fact that Piraeus does not currently have any banking operations in the United States, the Board has concluded that consummation of the proposal would not have a significantly adverse effect on competition or on the concentration of banking resources in any relevant banking market, and that competitive considerations are consistent with approval.
The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAED in this study was 50,000 [micro]g/kg/day, and the effects observed at the LOAEL were weight loss or reduction in weight gain.
As a result, consummation of the proposal would have a de minimis effect on competition, and the Board has concluded that the proposal would not result in a significantly adverse effect on competition in any relevant market.
Accordingly, the Board concludes that the proposal would not have a significantly adverse effect on competition or on the concentration of banking resources in any relevant banking market.

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