adulteration


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Related to adulteration: Adulteration of food

adulteration

 [ah-dul″ter-a´shun]
addition of an impure, cheap, or unnecessary ingredient to cheat, cheapen, or falsify a preparation.

a·dul·ter·a·tion

(ă-dŭl-tĕr-ā'shŭn),
The alteration of any substance by the deliberate addition of a component not ordinarily part of that substance; usually used to imply that the substance is debased as a result.

adulteration

/adul·te·ra·tion/ (ah-dul″ter-a´shun) addition of an impure, cheap, or unnecessary ingredient to cheat, cheapen, or falsify a preparation; in legal terminology, incorrect labeling, including dosage not in accordance with the label.

adulteration

[ədul′tərā′shən]
Etymology: L, adulterare, to defile
the debasement or dilution of the purity of any substance, process, or activity by the addition of extraneous material.

Adulteration

Pharmacology The substitution of one material or substance for another, such that a manufactured product is incorrectly labelled and/or dosage information is not in accordance with US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) requirements.
Vox populi The addition of an ersatz to a thing, which decreases its potency or value, or adds unnecessary ingredients.

adulteration

Pharmacology The substitution of one material or substance for another, such that a manufactured product is incorrectly labeled and/or dosage information is not in accordance with the FDA requirements, which ↓ potency or value, or adds unnecessary ingredients

ad·ul·ter·a·tion

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ā'shŭn)
The alteration of any substance by the deliberate addition of a component not ordinarily part of that substance; usually used to imply that the substance is debased as a result.

adulteration,

n an accidental or purposeful addition of an impure substance to a product. This results in an alteration of properties and composition of the substance, thereby diminishing its quality.

ad·ul·ter·a·tion

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ā'shŭn)
The alteration of any substance by the deliberate addition of a component not ordinarily part of that substance; usually used to imply that the substance is debased as a result.

adulteration

addition of an impure, cheap or unnecessary ingredient to cheat, cheapen or falsify a preparation. Adulteration of ox beef with horsemeat is an example. See also substitution.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the absence of such a screen, test administrators must then either use a separate adulteration screen or send the specimen to a lab if cheating is suspected.
Migrating the technology to other food groups that are susceptible to fraud or adulteration such as fish, juices and wine is also planned.
some common forms of petroleum products adulteration and potential adulterants:
1) Federal Register - Focused Mitigation Strategies To Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration (https://www.
Stable isotopic ratio analysis can distinguish between organic and inorganic sources of nitrogen and has been used to detect adulteration of food, including honey (Kropf et al.
Chemical adulteration, the second type, involves adding ammonia, sodium bicarbonate and sodium hydroxide.
Recognize that adulteration is not a geographic issue; it is a global issue.
The closing webinar on adulteration and global sourcing will bring a panel of American experts together to discuss the benefits and hazards of sourcing ingredients internationally.
Like large-scale milk adulteration or illegal sand mining in Maharashtra, this is not something the authorities or the people were unaware of as it was almost accepted by ordinary Indians that they could do little about it.
The chief minister had asked us to check all sweet items, especially for adulteration and any colourization.