adulterant

(redirected from adulterants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

a·dul·ter·ant

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ănt),
An impurity; an additive that is considered to have an undesirable effect or to dilute the active material so as to reduce its therapeutic or monetary value.

a·dul·ter·ant

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ănt)
An impurity; an additive that is considered to have an undesirable effect or to dilute the active material so as to reduce its therapeutic or monetary value.

a·dul·ter·ant

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ănt)
An impurity; an additive that is considered to have an undesirable effect or to dilute the active material so as to reduce its therapeutic value.
References in periodicals archive ?
suitability in detecting known adulterants, if they are present in a tested material); labor and analysis time comprise the secondary evaluation criteria.
Those laws define an adulterant as an added substance that is "deleterious" and may render food injurious to health.
Detection of adulterants or adulteration in Petroleum Products is quite a rigorous and cumbersome task owing to the basic fact that they are all made up of hydrocarbons with relatively same background characteristics.
As in ATR-FTIR analysis, selected organic fertilizer samples were doped with the adulterants (fig.
As of September 2009, the tissue mill began using a technique called "Fuel Separation" to process and clean fuel used in the plant from adulterants.
This work looks at how people try to beat drug tests with adulterants in urine and the consumption of various substances to alter urine composition, and explains how lawyers typically try to defend positive urine test results.
It eliminates any possible contamination with unwanted components such as lipids, carbohydrates, off-taste substances and low-molecular weight adulterants such as melamine.
The mechanisms by which cocaine causes its destructive effects include local ischemia secondary to vasoconstriction, inflammation caused by chemical adulterants put in "cut" cocaine, and infection secondary to trauma, decreased local immunity, and impaired mucociliary transport.
Newer urine adulterants, however, such as Urine Luck, UrinAid, Klear, and Whizzies, cannot be detected by routine specimen-integrity tests.
Drug-testing laboratories eventually do detect adulterants, but "it's a kind of cat and mouse game," Shelton points out.
After purchasing drug masking products from Web sites, GAO investigators used adulterants at four of the collection sites and substitute synthetic urine at another four sites without being caught by site collectors--demonstrating that these products could easily be brought into a collection site and used during a test.