adsorbent


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adsorbent

 [ad-sorb´ent]
1. pertaining to or characterized by adsorption.
2. a substance that attracts other materials or particles to its surface.
gastrointestinal adsorbent a substance, usually a powder, taken to adsorb gases, toxins, and bacteria in the stomach and intestines. Examples include activated charcoal and kaolin.

ad·sorb·ent

(ad-sōr'bĕnt),
1. A substance that adsorbs, that is, a solid substance endowed with the property of attaching other substances to its surface without any covalent bonding, for example, activated charcoal.
2. An antigen or antibody used in immune adsorption.

adsorbent

/ad·sor·bent/ (ad-sor´bent)
1. pertaining to or characterized by adsorption.
2. a substance that attracts other materials or particles to its surface by adsorption.

adsorbent

[adsôr′bənt]
a substance, such as activated charcoal, that takes up another by the process of adsorption, as by the attachment of one substance to the surface of the other.

ad·sorb·ent

(ad-sōr'bĕnt)
1. A solid substance with the property of attaching other substances to its surface without covalent bonding.
2. An antigen or antibody used in immune adsorption.

adsorbent

a substance that allows gas, liquid or solids in suspension to attach to its surface without itself undergoing a chemical change

ad·sorb·ent

(ad-sōr'bĕnt)
1. Substance that adsorbs, i.e., a solid substance endowed with the property of attaching other substances to its surface without any covalent bonding, e.g., activated charcoal.
2. An antigen or antibody used in immune adsorption.

adsorbent (adsor´bənt),

adj a substance that adsorbs, such as activated charcoal and clay.

adsorbent

1. pertaining to or characterized by adsorption.
2. a substance that attracts other materials or particles to its surface.

gastrointestinal adsorbent
a substance, usually a powder, administered to adsorb gases, toxins and bacteria in the stomach and intestines. Examples include activated charcoal and kaolin.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was investigated that the correlation coefficients for the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for the adsorbent treated with both HCl and KOH are low.
The initial pH of the solution had the greatest effect on removal (%), followed by adsorbent dosage, adsorbent dosage-initial pH interaction, contact time, contact time-initial pH interaction, contact time-adsorbent dosage interaction and contact time-adsorbent dosage-initial pH.
The adsorbents are crystalline materials designed to selectively remove radioactive ions, particularly cesium and strontium, from liquids.
PCZ] consisted of performing a mixture of 50 mg of the adsorbent in 50 mL aqueous KCl at two concentrations (0.
The removal efficiency was enhanced until it reaches a saturation point, after that the increase in adsorbent dosage does not change the percentage removal.
In the present investigation, fly ash, an industrial waste, was used as the adsorbent for the adsorption of reactive blue 25 dye from aqueous solutions.
the adsorbent, not just the past operation of a plant.
V (l) is the operating volume of the solution M (mg) is the mass of dry adsorbent
12 g of each adsorbent was added into a conical flask with 50 mL of phosphate solutions (50, 100, and 200 mg/L).
Batzias and Sidiras found that the mixing at higher agitation rate transferred additional energy and thus greater force which resulted in breaking the bonds between the adsorbent and the dye (Batzias and Sidiras 2007).