adrenergic blockade


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to adrenergic blockade: propranolol, Adrenergic receptors

blockade

 [blok-ād´]
1. in pharmacology, the blocking of the effect of a neurotransmitter or hormone by a drug.
2. in histochemistry, a chemical reaction that modifies certain chemical groups and blocks a specific staining method.
adrenergic blockade selective inhibition of the response to sympathetic impulses transmitted by epinephrine or norepinephrine at alpha or beta receptor sites of an effector organ or postganglionic adrenergic neuron. See also adrenergic blocking agent.
cholinergic blockade selective inhibition of cholinergic nerve impulses at autonomic ganglionic synapses, postganglionic parasympathetic effectors, or neuromuscular junctions. See also cholinergic blocking agent.
ganglionic blockade inhibition by drugs of nerve impulse transmission at autonomic ganglionic synapses; see also ganglionic blocking agent.
narcotic blockade inhibition of the euphoric effects of narcotic drugs by the use of other drugs, such as methadone, in the treatment of addiction.
neuromuscular blockade a failure in neuromuscular transmission that can be induced pharmacologically or result from any of various disturbances at the myoneural junction. See also neuromuscular blocking agent.
sympathetic blockade block of nerve impulse transmission between a preganglionic sympathetic fiber and the ganglion cell.

ad·re·ner·gic block·ade

selective inhibition by a drug of the responses of effector cells to adrenergic sympathetic nerve impulses (sympatholytic) and to epinephrine and related amines (adrenolytic).

ad·re·ner·gic block·ade

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik blok-ād')
Selective inhibition by a drug of the responses of effector cells to adrenergic sympathetic nerve impulses (sympatholytic) and to epinephrine and related amines (adrenolytic).

ad·re·ner·gic block·ade

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik blok-ād')
Selective inhibition by a drug of the responses of effector cells to adrenergic sympathetic nerve impulses (sympatholytic) and to epinephrine and related amines (adrenolytic).

adrenergic

1. activated by, characteristic of, or secreting epinephrine or substances with activities similar to those of epinephrine. The term is applied to those nerve fibers of the sympathetic nervous system that release norepinephrine (and possibly small amounts of epinephrine) at a synapse when a nerve impulse passes.
2. an agent that acts like epinephrine. Called also sympathomimetic.

adrenergic agents
sympathomimetic amines which exert their effects on adrenergic receptors of effector cells innervated by the sympathetic nervous system. The administration of these adrenergic agonists mimics the physiological effects of sympathoadrenal discharge.
adrenergic alpha-blockers, beta-blockers
see adrenergic blockade.
adrenergic amines
these are the sympathomimetic amines. They have similar but not identical structures and actions. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and isoproterenol are catecholamines but differ in their effects. Norepinephrine is primarily an activator of alpha-receptors whereas isoproterenol is a selective beta-receptor agonist. Epinephrine is an active agonist for both alpha- and beta-receptors. Ephedrine is the classical noncatecholamine sympathetic agonist.
adrenergic blockade
adrenergic blocking agents prevent the activation of adrenergic receptors. They may be alpha-blockers, e.g. ergot, or beta-blockers such as propranolol.
adrenergic blocking agent
a drug that blocks the secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine at the postganglionic nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system. By blocking these adrenergic substances, which cause constriction of blood vessels and increased cardiac output, adrenergic blocking agents produce a dilatation of the blood vessels and a decrease in cardiac output.
adrenergic nerves
see adrenergic (1) (above).
adrenergic nervous system
see sympathetic nervous system.
adrenergic receptors
class of receptors named after the action of adrenalin(e), the alternative name for epinephrine. Alpha receptors, which are stimulated by norepinephrine and blocked by agents such as phenoxybenzamine, are categorized into two classes, α1 and α2, which have different actions. α1 adrenergic actions include contraction of the iris, decreased motility in the intestine, and potassium and water secretions from the salivary glands. α2 adrenergic receptors inhibit adenylate cyclase, rather than activating it. Beta receptors, which are stimulated by epinephrine and blocked by agents such as propranolol, are also categorized into two types; β1 adrenergic receptors, which produce lipolysis and cardiostimulation, and β2 adrenergic receptors, which produce bronchodilatation and vasodilatation.

blockade

1. in pharmacology, the blocking of the effect of a neurotransmitter or hormone by a drug.
2. in histochemistry, a chemical reaction that modifies certain chemical groups and blocks a specific staining method.

adrenergic blockade
see adrenergic blockade.
cholinergic blockade
see cholinergic blockade.
narcotic blockade
inhibition of the euphoric effects of narcotic drugs by the use of other drugs, such as methadone, in the treatment of addiction.
sympathetic blockade
block of nerve impulse transmission between a preganglionic sympathetic fiber and the ganglion cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
When there are absolute contraindications to beta adrenergic blockade, rate slowing may also be achieved by iv.
Schenker et al (11) advise that after the 24th week, the pregnancy should be allowed to continue under adequate adrenergic blockade until fetal maturity is achieved.