adrenergic

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ad·re·ner·gic

(ad-rĕ-ner'jik),
1. Relating to nerve cells or fibers of the autonomic nervous system that use norepinephrine as their neurotransmitter. Compare: cholinergic.
2. Relating to drugs that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system.
[adren- + G. ergon, work]

adrenergic

/ad·ren·er·gic/ (ad″ren-er´jik)
1. activated by, characteristic of, or secreting epinephrine or related substances, particularly the sympathetic nerve fibers that liberate norepinephrine at a synapse when a nerve impulse passes.
2. any agent that produces such an effect. See also under receptor.

adrenergic

(ăd′rə-nûr′jĭk)
adj.
1. Activated by or capable of releasing epinephrine or a similar substance, especially in the sympathetic nervous system: adrenergic receptors.
2. Having physiological effects similar to those of epinephrine: an adrenergic amine.

ad′re·ner′gi·cal·ly adv.

adrenergic

[ad′rinur′jik]
Etymology: L, ad + ren; Gk, ergon, work
1 pertaining to sympathetic nerve fibers of the autonomic nervous system that liberate norepinephrine at a synapse where a nerve impulse passes.

Adrenergic

adjective Referring to
(1) Neural activation by catecholamines—e.g., adrenaline/epinephrine, noradrenaline/norepinephrine, dopamine.
(2) Sympathetic nerve fibres that liberate catecholamines into a synapse.
noun Any agent with adrenergic-agonist activity.

adrenergic

adjective Referring to
1. Neural activation by catecholamines–eg, epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine. See Biogenic amines, Neurotransmitters, Sympathetic nervous system.
2. Sympathetic nerve fibers that liberate epinephrine or norepinephrine into a synapse noun Any agent with adrenergic–agonist activity.

ad·re·ner·gic

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik)
1. Relating to nerve cells or fibers of the autonomic nervous system that employ norepinephrine as their neurotransmitter.
Compare: cholinergic
2. Relating to drugs that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system.
See: alpha (α)-adrenergic receptors, beta (β)-adrenergic receptors
[adren- + G. ergon, work]

adrenergic

Having effects similar to those of ADRENALINE. Drugs with adrenaline-like action are called adrenergic. A nerve which releases noradrenaline (a substance closely related to adrenaline) at its endings to pass on its impulses to other nerves, or to muscle fibres, is described as an adrenergic nerve.

adrenergic

(of nerve endings) secreting ADRENALINE and NORADRENALINE on the arrival of a NERVE IMPULSE. These substances then stimulate the effector nerve fibres in the SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM of many vertebrates in much the same way as ACETYLCHOLINE acts as a transmitter substance in CHOLINERGIC nerve fibres.

Adrenergic

Activated by adrenalin (norepinephrine), loosely applied to the sympathetic nervous system responses.

adrenergic

term used generically to describe nerves which liberate either adrenaline ( epinephrine ) or noradrenaline ( norepinephrine ) as a neurotransmitter from their endings; also in common usage in USA as an adjective for things associated with adrenaline or noradrenaline such as receptors. noradrenergic is sometimes used specifically to describe noradrenaline-releasing nerves. See also adrenoceptors.

adrenergic

autonomic nerve cells/fibres (e.g. postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings) using adrenaline as their neurotransmitter

adrenergic

drugs that mimic sympathetic nervous system activity

adrenergic 

1. Relating to a neuron that is activated or capable of releasing adrenaline (epinephrine).
2. Having an effect similar to adrenaline (epinephrine).
3. Relating to drugs that mimic the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (sympathomimetic drugs).

ad·re·ner·gic

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik)
1. Relating to nerve cells or fibers of the autonomic nervous system that use norepinephrine as their neurotransmitter.
2. Relating to drugs that mimic actions of the sympathetic nervous system.
[adren- + G. ergon, work]

adrenergic (ad´rinur´jik),

adj 1. transmitted by norepinephrine or activated by norepinephrine or the other sympathomimetic agents.
n 2. a term applied to nerve fibers that liberate epinephrine or norepinephrine at a synapse when a nerve impulse passes.
n 3. a drug that mimics the action of adrenergic nerves.
adrenergic agonists,
n.pl drugs that mimic the actions of norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter, resulting in stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system.
adrenergic blocking agent,
n See agent, adrenergic blocking.
adrenergic fibers,
adrenergic receptors,

adrenergic

1. activated by, characteristic of, or secreting epinephrine or substances with activities similar to those of epinephrine. The term is applied to those nerve fibers of the sympathetic nervous system that release norepinephrine (and possibly small amounts of epinephrine) at a synapse when a nerve impulse passes.
2. an agent that acts like epinephrine. Called also sympathomimetic.

adrenergic agents
sympathomimetic amines which exert their effects on adrenergic receptors of effector cells innervated by the sympathetic nervous system. The administration of these adrenergic agonists mimics the physiological effects of sympathoadrenal discharge.
adrenergic alpha-blockers, beta-blockers
see adrenergic blockade.
adrenergic amines
these are the sympathomimetic amines. They have similar but not identical structures and actions. Epinephrine, norepinephrine and isoproterenol are catecholamines but differ in their effects. Norepinephrine is primarily an activator of alpha-receptors whereas isoproterenol is a selective beta-receptor agonist. Epinephrine is an active agonist for both alpha- and beta-receptors. Ephedrine is the classical noncatecholamine sympathetic agonist.
adrenergic blockade
adrenergic blocking agents prevent the activation of adrenergic receptors. They may be alpha-blockers, e.g. ergot, or beta-blockers such as propranolol.
adrenergic blocking agent
a drug that blocks the secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine at the postganglionic nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system. By blocking these adrenergic substances, which cause constriction of blood vessels and increased cardiac output, adrenergic blocking agents produce a dilatation of the blood vessels and a decrease in cardiac output.
adrenergic nerves
see adrenergic (1) (above).
adrenergic nervous system
see sympathetic nervous system.
adrenergic receptors
class of receptors named after the action of adrenalin(e), the alternative name for epinephrine. Alpha receptors, which are stimulated by norepinephrine and blocked by agents such as phenoxybenzamine, are categorized into two classes, α1 and α2, which have different actions. α1 adrenergic actions include contraction of the iris, decreased motility in the intestine, and potassium and water secretions from the salivary glands. α2 adrenergic receptors inhibit adenylate cyclase, rather than activating it. Beta receptors, which are stimulated by epinephrine and blocked by agents such as propranolol, are also categorized into two types; β1 adrenergic receptors, which produce lipolysis and cardiostimulation, and β2 adrenergic receptors, which produce bronchodilatation and vasodilatation.