androgen

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androgen

 [an´dro-jen]
any steroid hormone that promotes male secondary sex characters. The two main androgens are androsterone and testosterone. Called also androgenic hormone. adj., adj androgen´ic. 

The androgenic hormones are internal endocrine secretions circulating in the bloodstream and manufactured mainly by the testes under stimulation from the pituitary gland. To a lesser extent, androgens are produced by the adrenal glands in both sexes, as well as by the ovaries in women. Thus women normally have a small percentage of male hormones, in the same way that men's bodies contain some female sex hormones, the estrogens. Male secondary sex characters include growth of the beard and deepening of the voice at puberty. Androgens also stimulate the growth of muscle and bones throughout the body and thus account in part for the greater strength and size of men as compared to women.
androgen insensitivity syndrome complete androgen resistance.

an·dro·gen

(an'drō-jen),
Generic term for an agent, usually a hormone (for example, androsterone, testosterone), which stimulates activity of the accessory male sex organs, encourages development of male sex characteristics, or prevents changes in the latter due to castration; natural androgens are steroids, derivatives of androstane.
Synonym(s): testoid (2)

androgen

/an·dro·gen/ (an´dro-jen) any substance, e.g., testosterone, that promotes masculinization.
adrenal androgens  the 19-carbon steroids synthesized by the adrenal cortex that function as weak steroids or steroid precursors; e.g., dehydroepiandrosterone.

androgen

(ăn′drə-jən)
n.
A steroid hormone, such as testosterone or androsterone, that controls the development and maintenance of masculine characteristics. Also called androgenic hormone.

an′dro·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

androgen

[an′drəjin]
Etymology: Gk, andros + genein, to produce
any steroid hormone that increases male characteristics. Natural hormones, such as testosterone and its esters and analogs, are primarily used as substitution therapy. androgenic, adj.

an·dro·gen

(an'drŏ-jen)
Generic term for an agent, usually a hormone (e.g., androsterone, testosterone), which stimulates activity of the accessory male sex organs, promotes development of male sex characteristics, or prevents changes in the latter that follow castration; natural androgens are steroids, derivatives of androstane.

androgen

one of several types of male hormone that stimulate the development and maintenance of the male's SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERISTICS. Naturally occurring androgens (e.g. TESTOSTERONE) are STEROIDS which are produced mainly in the testis (see INTERSTITIAL CELLS), but also to a small extent in the OVARY and ADRENAL CORTEX.

Androgen

A natural or artificial steroid that acts as a male sex hormone. Androgens are responsible for the development of male sex organs and secondary sexual characteristics. Testosterone and androsterone are androgens.

androgen

hormone or agent stimulating accessory male sex organs and promoting male sexual characteristics development

an·dro·gen

(an'drŏ-jen)
Generic term for an agent, usually a hormone (e.g., androsterone, testosterone), which stimulates activity of the accessory male sex organs, encourages development of male sex characteristics, or prevents changes in the latter due to castration.

androgen (an´drōjen),

n a substance that possesses masculinizing qualities, such as testosterone.

androgen

any steroid hormone which promotes male characteristics. The two main androgens are androstenedione and testosterone.

androgen binding protein
generated by Sertoli cells; binds androgens within the adluminal compartment of the testis.
androgen insensitivity
see testicular feminization.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, adrenal androgens were more suppressed in the osteopenic group, he noted.
Prolactin levels, as well as HPA-axis hyporeactivity in the breastfeeding woman may indirectly influence desire by acting to reduce ovarian and adrenal androgen secretion, respectively.
It's important to include an assessment for adrenal androgens as well: a DHEA sulfate level in serum or DHEA in saliva.
The inherent enzyme block leads to increased adrenal precursor concentrations despite normalization of ACTH; thus glucocorticoidsmust be replaced at a supraphysiologic concentration to fully normalize adrenal androgens (1).
Treatment with synthetic steroids that suppress the synthesis of testosterone and interfere with the activity of adrenal androgens has been reliably associated with diminished sexual interest and desire in at least 3 groups of individuals: Sex offenders, prostate cancer patients, and women suffering from various androgen-dependent hair and skin conditions.
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) [5] and its sulfated form, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), are adrenal androgens that are precursors of androgens and estrogens (2).
Dr Notelovitz pointed out that androgens may improve symptom relief in three ways: (1) by lowering sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, which, in turn, results in a greater amount of bioavailable estrogen; (2) by a direct effect of androgens; or (3) by increased bioavailability of adrenal androgens (low adrenal androgen bioavailability may be induced by estrogen-alone therapy).
cal] concentration in aging men is the lowering of adrenal androgens that bind significantly to SHBG.
The learning objectives of the symposium are to: * Describe the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis; * Detail the importance of adrenal androgens to bone metabolism and abnormalities related to inflammation in SLE; * Consider the roles of hormonal therapy, including androgens and estrogens, in the treatment of patients with SLE in their clinical practice; and * Synthesize the disease and treatment related morbidities associated with SLE with emphasis on damage to bone as part of the intrinsic SLE disease process, relationship of bone loss to role of cumulative bone damage, and the role of standard SLE treatments to bone loss.
This would include not only those with conditions such as Addison's disease but also women on chronic corticosteroids, because they typically experience suppression of adrenal androgens, said Dr.
Defects in the enzymes 21-hydroxylase, 11-[beta]-hydroxylase, and 3-[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase lead to overproduction of adrenal androgens, with physical and psychological virilization of the affected female fetus.