admixture mapping

admixture mapping

Gene mapping of populations of mixed ancestry—e.g., African Americans, Latino/Hispanics—to identify gene loci responsible for differences in disease frequencies. Admixture mapping attempts to correlate the degree of ancestry near a gene locus to a disease or trait of interest, and assumes that differences in disease rates are linked to differences in the frequencies of disease-causing genetic variants between populations. In an admixed population, these causal variants occur more frequently on chromosomal segments inherited from one or the other ancestral population.
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DNAPrint has been at the forefront of the effort to optimize Admixture Mapping (AM) methodology using eye, hair and skin pigmentation (which are relatively easy to measure) as model systems.
The goal of the collaboration is to develop novel statistical genomics algorithms for a new style of genome screening called Admixture Mapping.
McKeigue invented the Admixture Mapping (AM) technique in 1998.
McKeigue and Mark Shriver of the Pennsylvania State University to augment Admixture Mapping methods and build Ancestry Informative Marker (AIM) libraries for efficient commercial-scale screening of the genome.
He continued, "This deal confers a sort of pole position for the Company with respect to this exciting new genome scanning methodology, because it is not just the maps of AIMs that are necessary for Admixture Mapping, but advanced analytical tools that are capable of accommodating parameter uncertainty.
The platform functions by allowing a fine appreciation of population genomics structure relevant for solving complex human conditions, and it is based on a process called Mapping by Admixture Linkage Disequilibrium (MALD) or Admixture Mapping (AM).
On the other hand, Mapping by Admixture Linkage Disequilibrium (MALD) or Admixture Mapping (AM) takes advantage of the fact that in recently admixed populations (i.