adjustable gastric banding

adjustable gastric banding

(ă-jŭs′tă-bl)
A bariatric surgical treatment for obesity in which a Silastic belt encircles the proximal portion of the stomach, restricting the flow of food. The rest of the gastrointestinal tract is left unmodified. The belt initially permits the proximal stomach to hold just an ounce of food. The restriction gives patients a feeling of premature fullness after a small meal, which keeps them from overeating. It can be loosened after significant weight loss has occurred to permit slightly increased food intake. Weight loss with gastric banding, which results purely from limitations on food intake, tends to be less than what can be achieved with surgery, e.g., Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Relatively common complications of banding include nausea and vomiting, erosion of the band into the stomach, and wound infections. Some patients learn to eat slowly but continuously and fail to lose weight..
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Specifically, this report covers leading and emerging prescription-based weight loss (obesity) drugs, and minimally invasive medical devices, including: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) systems, intragastric balloon systems, implantable gastric stimulation devices, and other emerging device-based technologies, including nonsurgical/incisionless, transorally inserted or next-generation minimally invasive weight loss device therapies.
The European market is analyzed by the following Segments: Adjustable Gastric Banding, Gastric Bypass Devices, and Intragastric Balloon Devices.
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding in the treatment of obesity: a systematic literature review.
Contemporary bariatric surgeries include Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, sleeve gastrectomy, and mini--gastric bypass.
5 ( ANI ): Researchers have found that obese patients who underwent gastric bypass or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgical procedures experienced substantial weight loss three years after surgery, with most of the change occurring in the first year itself.
There are many surgical options -- adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass and gastric placation.
1,2,3,4,5,6) Fewer data exist on adverse neurologic effects following adjustable gastric banding and there are no well established therapeutic interventions for these complications when they occur.
There are three main options in bariatric surgery: adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass.
The expected percentage of excess weight loss is about 48 percent after adjustable gastric banding and 61 percent after sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass.
Medical history included laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding fitted in May, 2007, for class III obesity, when her body mass index (BMI) was 45.
Review of meta-analytic comparisons of bariatric surgery with a focus on laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding.
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is now promoted as a safer, potentially reversible and effective alternative to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current standard of care.
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