adjunct to anesthesia

adjunct to anesthesia

one of a number of drugs or techniques used to enhance anesthesia but that are not classified as anesthetics. Adjuncts to anesthesia are used before an anesthetic is administered as premedications and during anesthesia to augment anesthetic effects or diminish undesirable side effects. Premedications are given to reduce anxiety, sedate the patient, reduce nausea and vomiting, and reduce oral and respiratory secretions. Opioid analgesics, benzodiazepines, sedatives and hypnotics, phenothiazines, anticholinergics, antihistamines and antianxiety agents are common adjuncts to anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 billion in sales last year, sells Nimbus as an intravenous adjunct to anesthesia to relax a patient's muscles during surgery or with use of a tracheal breathing tube, according to court papers.
Decades of research has shown that surgical patients who use hypnosis as an adjunct to anesthesia, recover faster, experience less pain, nausea and blood loss and have a shorter hospital stay.
For example, fentanyl is a potent narcotic that is administered frequently in hospitals for the relief of pain as an adjunct to anesthesia in surgical procedures.