adiaspiromycosis

a·di·a·spi·ro·my·co·sis

(ā'dē-ă-spī'rō-mī-kō'sis),
A rare pulmonary mycosis of humans, rodents, and other animals that dig in soil or are aquatic, caused by the fungus Emmonsia parva var. crescens.

adiaspiromycosis

/adi·a·spi·ro·my·co·sis/ (ad″e-ah-spi″ro-mi-ko´sis) a pulmonary disease of many species of rodents and occasionally of humans, due to inhalation of spores of the fungi Emmonsia parva and E. crescens, and marked by huge spherules (adiaspores) in the lungs.

Adiaspiromycosis

A rare fungal infection which affects mammals, including rodents and humans, after inhalation of dust-borne microconidia of a fungus, Emmonsia parva var crescens, which causes most cases of adiaspiromycosis in Europe and is marked by the formation of large, thick-walled spherules (adiaspores) in lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes.
Clinical findings Dry cough, low-grade fever, fatigue, shortness of breath, pulmonary infiltrates, granulomatous dissemination. It may be an incidental finding during workup for other causes. The effects of infection—compromised lung function—depend on spore burden and immune competence: it is more severe in AIDS patients.  
DiffDx Coccidioides immitis, helminths, Rhinosporidium seeberi, starch granules.
Managment Itracozole.

adiaspiromycosis

a respiratory disease of humans and many animal species caused by the fungus Chrysosporium spp. and characterized by large, thick-walled spherules (adiaspores).
References in periodicals archive ?
Adiaspiromycosis causing respiratory failure and a review of human infections due to Emmonsia and Chrysosporium spp.
Molecular diagnosis of disseminated adiaspiromycosis due to Emmonsia crescens.
Molecular genetic variation in Emmonsia crescens and Emmonsia parva, etiologic agents of adiaspiromycosis, and their phylogenetic relationship to Blastomyces dermatitidis (Ajellomyces dermatitidis) and other systemic fungal pathogens.
Less Frequent Mycoses Caused by Dimorphic Environmental Molds: Adiaspiromycosis
As illustrated by articles in this issue about adiaspiromycosis (2), malaria (3,4), dengue (4), Chagas disease (5), Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (6), suspected Brazilian purpuric fever (7), and other infections, new diseases continue to emerge and old ones continue to undergo epidemiologic change throughout the vast Amazon River basin.
Acute conjunctivitis with episcleritis and anterior uveitis linked to adiaspiromycosis and fresh-water sponges, Amazon region, Brazil, 2005.
Human pulmonary adiaspiromycosis has been reported in the literature from multiple countries, including Russia, the Czech Republic, Guatemala, Brazil, and the United States (1-4); disseminated infection may occur in immunocompromised persons.
fungus in the scleral biopsy samples from children with severe disease in this outbreak suggests that conjunctival irritation was most likely followed by conjunctival exposure to conidia of this fungus, perhaps in dust caused in part by dry environmental conditions, similar to the exposure of respiratory mucosa described in case reports of pulmonary adiaspiromycosis (1-5,9).
Describe the mechanism of infection for adiaspiromycosis.
The presence of malaria, dengue fever, orally transmitted Chagas disease, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection, adiaspiromycosis, and many other emerging diseases indicates that emergence and epidemiologic change are vigorous and ongoing in the Amazon Basin.
Which of the following is the most common age group reported to be infected with ocular adiaspiromycosis in the initial case series of 17 patients in this article?
Which of the following is least likely to be a risk factor associated with ocular adiaspiromycosis in this case series?