adenosis


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Related to adenosis: sclerosing adenosis, microglandular adenosis

adenosis

 [ad″ĕ-no´sis]
1. any disease of a gland.
2. abnormal development of a gland.

ad·e·no·sis

(ad-ĕ-nō'sis),
1. A rarely used term for a generalized glandular disease.
2. Glandular tissue in one or more sites in which it is not usually found.

adenosis

/ad·e·no·sis/ (ad″ĕ-no´sis)
1. any disease of the glands.
2. the abnormal development of glandular tissue.

mammary sclerosing adenosis , sclerosing adenosis of breast a form of disease of the breast characterized by multiple firm tender nodules, fibrous tissue, mastodynia, and sometimes small cysts.

adenosis

(ăd′n-ō′sĭs)
n. pl. adeno·ses (-sēz′)
A disease of a gland, especially one marked by the abnormal formation or enlargement of glandular tissue.

adenosis

[ad′ənō′sis]
1 any disease of the glands, especially a lymphatic gland.
2 an abnormal development or enlargement of glandular tissue.

adenosis

Breast
Any hyperplastic process which primarily involves the glands of the breast.
 
Gynaecology
The presence of columnar epithelium in the vaginal fornices or vagina, which is often associated with prenatal exposure to DES.

Prostate
A lesion characterised by a well-circumscribed proliferation of benign glands, which is of clinical interest as certain histologic features—e.g., infiltrative growth pattern, single cells, prominent nucleoli, and mitoses—mimic low-grade adenocarcinoma.

adenosis

Breast Any hyperplastic process that primarily involves the glands of the breast. See Blunt duct adenosis, Sclerosing adenosis.

ad·e·no·sis

(ad'ĕ-nō'sis)
1. A more-or-less generalized glandular disease.
2. Glandular tissue in one or more sites in which it is not usually found.

adenosis

Excessive growth of GLANDS. The term is also used for any disease of glands.

ad·e·no·sis

(ad'ĕ-nō'sis)
Glandular tissue in sites in which it is not usually found.

adenosis

1. any disease of a gland.
2. abnormal development of a gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
26) The rarest adenosis variant of AME has an infiltrative growth pattern that resembles microglandular adenosis.
10) None of the aforementioned features are specific to radial scar and they can be seen in carcinomas, scars, or sclerosing adenosis.
Unlike AMACR, which can be negative in about 20% of unequivocal PCa; is positive in a subset of benign mimics of PCa, including adenosis and partial atrophy; and may show focal staining in up to 20% of morphologically benign glands, (29-31) our results here confirm that ERG staining is highly specific for PCa and is exceedingly rare in benign glands (including mimickers of PCa).
Sclerosing adenosis is a rare benign lesion arising in the transition zone of the prostate, characterized by a cellular proliferation of variably sized glands and solid nests surrounded by basement membrane material in a cellular stroma, which can be myxoid at times.
The objective of this study was to determine the breast cancer risk in a retrospective series of patients diagnosed with atypical apocrine adenosis in otherwise benign breast excisional biopsies.
Mucinous spherulosis has been associated with a variety of breast lesions including florid adenosis, sclerosing adenosis, and atypical ductal hyperplasia.
In breast tissues, the contractile protein SMA has been demonstrated in the normal MEC in 88% to 100% of cases, (19,33,34) in normal luminal/epithelial cells in 37% of cases, (34) and in the MEC associated with benign lesions (such as sclerosing adenosis and radial scars) in 95.
This discrepancy occurs commonly in pathology, and sclerosing adenosis necessitates a second review for newly diagnosed mammary carcinomas in most institutions.
23 Uterus Secretory endometrium 24 Uterus Suggestive of endometrial stromal sarcoma 25 Endometrium Suggestive of hydatidiform 26 Breast Glandular adenosis 27 Breast Phyllodes tumor 28 Stomach (biopsy) Suggestive of adenocarcinoma 29 Prostate (biopsy) Suggestive of carcinoma (<1 mm)/ASAP 30 Prostate (biopsy) Negative for neoplasia 31 Prostate (biopsy) Suggestive of carcinoma (<1 mm)/ASAP Case No.
15) There are numerous benign mimickers of prostatic adenocarcinoma that can pose diagnostic dilemmas, such as complete atrophy, adenosis, granulomatous prostatitis, partial atrophy, and crowded benign glands.
Tissue remnants or heterotopias relating to embryologic development constitute another large group, including examples of vaginal adenosis, (115-117) cervical mesonephric remnants (118) (Figure 12, A and B), adenomyoma (Brunner gland hamartoma) of the duodenum, (119) cutaneous rudimentary meningocele (120) (Figure 13, A and B), and glial heterotopias.
The benign entities most often misdiagnosed as prostatic adenocarcinoma are atrophy, crowded benign glands, adenosis (atypical adenomatous hyperplasia), and basal cell hyperplasia, depending on the study and type of tissue sample (needle biopsy versus TURP).