adduction


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

adduction

 [ah-duk´shun]
the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.
Adduction versus abduction of arm. From Chabner, 1996.

ad·duc·tion

(ă-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with abduction. In lecturing and dictation, some physicians pronounce the word "A D duction" to avoid ambiguity.
1. Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the nose.
3. A position resulting from such movement. Compare: abduction.

adduction

/ad·duc·tion/ (ah-duk´shun) the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.

adduction

[əduk′shən]
Etymology: L, adducere, to bring to
the movement of a limb toward the midline or axis of the body. Compare abduction. adduct, v.

Adduction

The movement of a limb or other body part, usually on a transverse plane, toward the axis or midline—medial plane—of the body.

ad·duc·tion

(ă-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits) or midline of the body.
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the nose.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
Compare: abduction

adduction

A movement towards the centre line of the body. Muscles which adduct are called adductors. The term derives from the Latin ad , to and ducere , to draw. Compare ABDUCTION.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

adduction

movement of the arm inwards to the side of the body, of a leg inwards towards the other leg, of a thumb, finger or toe towards the middle of the hand or foot; adductor a muscle with this action. Opposite of abduction. Figure 1.

adduction (·dukˑ·shn),

n joint movement toward the body along the horizontal plane.
Enlarge picture
Adduction.

adduction 

Rotation of an eye towards the midline (Fig. A6). See duction; paralysis of the third nerve; Duane's syndrome.
Fig. A6 Abduction of the right eye. Adduction of the left eyeenlarge picture
Fig. A6  Abduction of the right eye. Adduction of the left eye

ad·duc·tion

(Ad) (ă-dŭk'shŭn)
Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).

adduction (əduk´shən),

n the process of bringing two objects toward each other; the opposite of abduction.

adduction

the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.
References in periodicals archive ?
flexion, adduction, internal rotation, other) Parameters: Degrees of flexion (for example, 37 100% 0-90 degrees) __ to __ Degrees of adduction 31 84% __ to __ Degrees of internal rotation 26 70% __ to __ Other positions (please specify) 1 27% 13.
2008) Toe-out gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis partially transforms external knee adduction moment into flexion moment during early stance phase of gait: a tri-planar knee mechanism.
In patients over 20 kg, localization of the target anatomical structures using ultrasound on "point C" failed in 13% of patients in adduction and in 4.
Such tests can be performed in various different positions, standing, sitting with or without back support clinical setting: for the abduction the patient was sitting on the table without back support, advised to keep a straight position; while for the rotations and the horizontal adduction he or she was respectively recumbent and lying on his or her side.
In Pair 4, P9072 (speed) responded according to transitivity, and the baseline relations remained intact; furthermore, the participant had 100 % accuracy in the adduction test.
Our main finding was that resistance exercise performed on an UP increased horizontal abduction and adduction shoulder flexibility compared to exercise performed on a SP.
9] Foot prints help in assessing this deformity by using foot length variation and forefoot adduction angle.
Functional significance of arytenoid adduction with the suture attaching to cricoid cartilage versus to thyroid cartilage for unilateral paralytic dysphonia.
After univariate analysis, 9 variables-gender, age, BMI, hip abduction and adduction, ankle plantar flexion, subtalar inversion and eversion, and maximal calf girth-were eligible for selection into the multivariate model (p<0.
Human motion comprise of various movement such as standing, walking, stair climbing, single-legged stance, abduction, adduction and much more.
The coronal static PAPI measures revealed a significant difference between 6[degrees] abduction and 3[degrees] adduction and between 6[degrees] abduction and 6[degrees] adduction (Figure 2), while the coronal dynamic PAPI measures revealed a significant difference between 3[degrees] abduction and 3[degrees] adduction, between 6[degrees] abduction and 3[degrees] adduction, between 3[degrees] abduction and 6[degrees] adduction, and between 6[degrees] abduction and 6[degrees] adduction (Figure 2).
Their use actually increased the load on the inside of the knee, as measured by the external knee adduction moment.