adduction


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adduction

 [ah-duk´shun]
the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.
Adduction versus abduction of arm. From Chabner, 1996.

ad·duc·tion

(ă-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with abduction. In lecturing and dictation, some physicians pronounce the word "A D duction" to avoid ambiguity.
1. Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the nose.
3. A position resulting from such movement. Compare: abduction.

adduction

/ad·duc·tion/ (ah-duk´shun) the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.

adduction

[əduk′shən]
Etymology: L, adducere, to bring to
the movement of a limb toward the midline or axis of the body. Compare abduction. adduct, v.

Adduction

The movement of a limb or other body part, usually on a transverse plane, toward the axis or midline—medial plane—of the body.

ad·duc·tion

(ă-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits) or midline of the body.
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the nose.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
Compare: abduction

adduction

A movement towards the centre line of the body. Muscles which adduct are called adductors. The term derives from the Latin ad , to and ducere , to draw. Compare ABDUCTION.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

adduction

movement of the arm inwards to the side of the body, of a leg inwards towards the other leg, of a thumb, finger or toe towards the middle of the hand or foot; adductor a muscle with this action. Opposite of abduction. Figure 1.

adduction (·dukˑ·shn),

n joint movement toward the body along the horizontal plane.
Enlarge picture
Adduction.

adduction 

Rotation of an eye towards the midline (Fig. A6). See duction; paralysis of the third nerve; Duane's syndrome.
Fig. A6 Abduction of the right eye. Adduction of the left eyeenlarge picture
Fig. A6  Abduction of the right eye. Adduction of the left eye

ad·duc·tion

(Ad) (ă-dŭk'shŭn)
Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).

adduction (əduk´shən),

n the process of bringing two objects toward each other; the opposite of abduction.

adduction

the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.
References in periodicals archive ?
The inter ICC indexes result different from zero and thus statistically significant, exception made for those referring to the horizontal adduction movement for times 2 and 3 (p=0.
Because attaining normal adduction in the prosthetic limb is no longer practically regarded as achievable, the ischial containment design has become regarded as an optional socket variant, recommended for patients with a short residual femur length [14] and perhaps employed for issues of comfort [49].
Overall, a significant 13% reduction in subjects' external knee adduction was noted during their walking while barefoot and while wearing the unloading shoes, compared with walking in their normal walking shoes.
Therefore, this study has two main goals: (1) to quantify the peak abduction and adduction moments on the target side knee during the golf swing with a 300 externally rotated target side foot stance position and a square or neutral foot position, (2) to descriptively compare the magnitude of these peak moments with those presented in the literature for other activities of daily living (gait, stair climbing) and athletic maneuvers (cutting and drop-landing tasks).
Measurements were done with the femoral shafts vertical, at 15 [degrees] adduction and at 15 [degrees] abduction to determine initial strains as a control.
These postures were generated by varying the hip adduction angle from -10[degrees] to +10[degrees] (where the negative indicates abduction) in increments of 0.
The premise underlying this interest is that weakness of the aforementioned hip musculature may lead to an increase in hip adduction and internal rotation and excessive knee valgus, hence altering the forces acting upon the patellofemoral joint.
flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, elevation, depression, rotation, circumduction, etc.
The strategically positioned four-point hook-ups, located between the resident's knees and outside the shoulders, maintain a normalized, anatomical position without causing abduction or adduction of the legs.
An ankle strap is also standard for hip abduction, adduction and extension exercises.
Initial strobovideolaryngoscopy by the less experienced examiner (a PGY-6) revealed sluggish abduction and adduction of the right true vocal fold, as well as decreased amplitude of vibration.