address

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address

Informatics
The alphanumeric code for the location of point of communication on the Internet or an intranet.
 
Molecular biology
A site on a chromosome with a ‘character set’ of ≥ 16 base pairs which, at 416, makes that address unique, and unlikely to occur more than once on the genome.

Professional communication
A speech, oration or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may be didactic in nature.

address

pronounced uh-DRESS Professional communication A speech, oration, or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may have a didactic end. See Keynote address, National Library of Medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Addresser Based Systems, continuously family owned and operated, has been providing mail equipment since 1962 for mailers and printers.
2004), analyzing both the process of communication and its participants (the addresser and the addressee), their choice of communication strategies and tactics ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
1) "Narration can be defined as the transmitting of a message from the addresser to the addressed.
Such "tropes of race" describe and inscribe racial characters not only of their addressee but of their addresser.
Every letter presupposes some form of previous relationship between the addresser and the addressee.
In order to discuss this aestheticism, Somigli applies Jakobson's theory of language, noting how a barrier (or blockage) arose between addresser and addressee, as modernist artists concentrated on the code and context of the artistic message at the expense of communication itself.
9) As pointed out by Eriksen (1989, note 2), this activity-oriented communication form corresponds closely to one of six functions that Roman Jakobson has ascribed to the (linear) communication act, namely its phatic function: "The phatic function is to keep the channels of communication open; it is to maintain the relationship between addresser and addressee: it is to confirm that communication is taking place.
In this address, age and gender of the addresser are less important determinants.
Jakobson's "emotive function" proposed for texts is easily overlaid onto musical form: "The so-called emotive or 'expressive' function, focused on the addresser, aims a direct expression of the speaker's attitude toward what he is speaking about.
As word it is precisely the product of the reciprocal relationship between speaker and listener, addresser and addressee.
13) The first line of this stanza constructs the discursive frame of the poem, containing an addresser ("I"), an addressee ("you"), and a referent ("the thought of his mind").
To use Jakobson's terminology, an addresser sends a message to an addressee.