additive

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additive

 [ad´ĭ-tiv]
1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another, such as to improve its appearance or increase its nutritive value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv),
1. A substance not naturally part of a material (for example, food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (for example, preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In metric studies (for example, genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation. Compare: synergism.

additive

[ad′itiv]
any substance added intentionally or indirectly that becomes a part of the food, pharmaceutical, or other product. Additives may be introduced in growing, processing, packaging, storage, or cooking or other final preparation for consumption.

Additive

adjective
(1) See Additive effect
(2) Characterised by addition
noun A substance—e.g., a flavouring agent, preservative, vitamin or other substance—which is added to an active substance to improve appearance, texture, or increase shelf-life or nutritional value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
1. A substance not naturally a part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In quantitative studies (e.g., genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation.
Compare: synergism

additive

Any substance added to something, especially a food, in order to improve or preserve it. Additives are of economic and nutritional importance but some people may display allergic sensitivity to some of them.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
A substance not naturally part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).

additive,

n an ingredient added to a food, drug, or other preparation to produce a desired result, such as color or consistency, unrelated to the primary purpose of the preparation.

additive

1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another to improve its appearance, increase its nutritive value, etc. See feed additive.

food additive
material added to food; includes preservatives, emulsifiers, stabilizers, acids, nonstick agents, humectants, firming agents, antifoaming agents, colorings and flavorings, solvents, and even nutritive materials such as minerals and vitamins.
additive gene action
1. total contribution made by all loci to a polygenic trait.
2. when the heterozygote is intermediate in phenotype between the two homozygotes, i.e. a lack of dominance.
additive genetic relationship
the degree of relationship (number of genes held in common) between two individuals neither of which is inbred; the minimum relationship is 0 and the maximum is 1.0.
additive genetic variance
variance attributed to the mean effect of substituting one allele for another at any given loci.
intramammary infusion additive
agents, e.g. anti-inflammatories, added to improve pharmacological efficacy.
additive relationship
see additive genetic relationship (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
The phytogenic feed additives feed additivesmarket is segmented into four parts based on the end-use type, packaging type, distribution channels, and geography.
USDA certified-organic producers only use safe additives, like beet juice, to add a reddish color.
Liquid and paste dispersions for all thermoplastics and thermosets can include various processing additives.
Food Standards Agency (FSA) question whether these results are relevant to the human consumption of these additives.
Some examples of this coagulant concept being used in different parts of the industry include internal size promotion or fixation, efficiency gains for wet end starch and dry strength additives, optical whitener quenching, incoming water color removal, effluent neutralization prior to the clarifier, dual polymer retention systems, and drainage aids for save alls and forming fabrics.
Other researchers have suggested that changes in engine temperature or chemical interactions between the additive and metal surfaces trigger a lubricant's function.
The goal is to overcome soy stereotypes by impressing on consumers that protein additives, in addition to being healthy, can be tasty and possess a pleasant consistency and mouth feel.
Lubricant Additives (published 07/2000, 168 pages) is available for $3,500 from The Freedonia Group, Inc.
Today, food and drink makers use additives to spur your appetite in a number of ways:
By "100 percent natural," manufacturers mean they don't use reconstituted tobacco or the flavor-enhancing additives that caused an uproar two years ago, when cigarette makers revealed a list of nearly 600 chemicals that have been added to cigarettes over the years.
Although salt, baking soda, vanilla and yeast are commonly used in foods today, many people tend to think of any additives added to foods as complex chemical compounds.
LONDON -- Merchant Research & Consulting, Ltd takes pride in announcing the organization of its new state-of-art conference, the International Gasoline Additives Conference 2012.