additive


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Related to additive: additive identity, food additive, Additive manufacturing, Additive synthesis, Fuel additive, additive effect

additive

 [ad´ĭ-tiv]
1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another, such as to improve its appearance or increase its nutritive value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv),
1. A substance not naturally part of a material (for example, food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (for example, preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In metric studies (for example, genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation. Compare: synergism.

additive

[ad′itiv]
any substance added intentionally or indirectly that becomes a part of the food, pharmaceutical, or other product. Additives may be introduced in growing, processing, packaging, storage, or cooking or other final preparation for consumption.

Additive

adjective
(1) See Additive effect
(2) Characterised by addition
noun A substance—e.g., a flavouring agent, preservative, vitamin or other substance—which is added to an active substance to improve appearance, texture, or increase shelf-life or nutritional value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
1. A substance not naturally a part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In quantitative studies (e.g., genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation.
Compare: synergism

additive

Any substance added to something, especially a food, in order to improve or preserve it. Additives are of economic and nutritional importance but some people may display allergic sensitivity to some of them.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
A substance not naturally part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).

additive,

n an ingredient added to a food, drug, or other preparation to produce a desired result, such as color or consistency, unrelated to the primary purpose of the preparation.

additive

1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another to improve its appearance, increase its nutritive value, etc. See feed additive.

food additive
material added to food; includes preservatives, emulsifiers, stabilizers, acids, nonstick agents, humectants, firming agents, antifoaming agents, colorings and flavorings, solvents, and even nutritive materials such as minerals and vitamins.
additive gene action
1. total contribution made by all loci to a polygenic trait.
2. when the heterozygote is intermediate in phenotype between the two homozygotes, i.e. a lack of dominance.
additive genetic relationship
the degree of relationship (number of genes held in common) between two individuals neither of which is inbred; the minimum relationship is 0 and the maximum is 1.0.
additive genetic variance
variance attributed to the mean effect of substituting one allele for another at any given loci.
intramammary infusion additive
agents, e.g. anti-inflammatories, added to improve pharmacological efficacy.
additive relationship
see additive genetic relationship (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Even at the green grocery store, harmful food additives lurk behind innocent-looking labels.
This company offers over 600 process or resin specific process aid additives and external release agents.
Colorwel custom color concentrates and dry colors for all thermoplastics include custom additive packages and specialty colors (pearlescents, fluorescents, phosphorescents, and metallics).
Lau says young children may be especially at risk for the type of toxicity observed in the nerve-cell cultures, because effects were seen at concentrations of additives she says are theoretically achievable in plasma by eating foods and drinks typically consumed by children--for example, a snack of corn chips, which may contain MSG, and a fruit juice drink, which may contain aspartame.
Other researchers have suggested that changes in engine temperature or chemical interactions between the additive and metal surfaces trigger a lubricant's function.
The optimum additive feed point is selected through an understanding of all of the chemistries, experience on that particular machine and other machines, and--in some cases--through lab testing.
The additive also improved the cumulative mulling effect of the return sand by increasing the water bonding capabilities.
Also, before the merger even took place, DuPont Protein Technologies reached out to mainstream consumers, positioning Solae as a "good tasting" as well as nutritious additive.
The Color Additive Amendments to the FD&C Act require dyes used in foods, drugs, cosmetics and certain medical devices to be approved by FDA prior to their marketing.
As a "rule of thumb," these additives are added at 3-15 ounces/ton of molding sand.
This Frost & Sullivan research service titled EMEA Automotive and Marine Performance Fuel Additives Markets provides an analysis of the increasing significance of additives in automotive and marine fuels in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
Additive modifier Nylostab SEED is recommended for the stabilization of nylon.