addition reaction

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addition reaction

A reaction in organic chemistry in which a single chemical is formed from two or more monomers or substances.
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After the Michael addition reaction was complete as demonstrated by NMR, polyesterification was performed by increasing the reaction temperature to 120[degrees]C, adding 0.
The Michael addition reaction reached complete conversion at 60[degrees]C and was found to approach stoichiometric conversions at 30[degrees]C.
Most Type I coagents exclusively homopolymerize and form viable crosslinks through radical addition reactions.
As the peroxides used are also polar in nature, it is likely that a disproportionate amount of the radicals formed are partitioned in the coagent domains as well, promoting thermoset filler-like particles produced from radical addition reactions (ref.
The population is defined by the collection of elastomer backbone sites or even the ones in other initially present species and in various reaction intermediates and products, available for hydrogen abstraction, addition reactions, radical coupling (crosslink formation), polymer scission, or radical transfer.
Therefore, the assumption of first order, which is valid for elastomers with high degree of unsaturation like BR and natural rubber (NR), is not true for the elastomers with low unsaturation like poly(iso-butylene) (IIR), as far as addition reactions are concerned.
It is possible that the reactivity of the highly unsaturated NBR polymer chain may compete favorably with radical addition reactions of these monomers, the effect being a higher percentage of well distributed crosslinks.
It is possible that addition reactions between PDM monomers are not favored, limiting the monomer's ability to homopolymerize.
2] as a catalyst without adding any bromoform, only isomerized product was formed with no addition reaction taking place in all three methods.
5 M) for the reaction mixture, only the isomerized trans product was formed in trace amounts with no addition reaction taking place in all three methods.
Based on the proposed mechanisms involved in the Michael addition reaction of the -C=C- group of BMI with the active hydrogen atom of the >[CH.
However, the potential Michael addition reaction cannot be ruled out because each BTA molecule contains two secondary amine groups, which can facilitate the polymerization of BMI with BTA according to the Michael addition reaction mechanism.