insult

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in·sult

(in'sŭlt),
An injury, attack, or trauma.
[LL. insultus, fr L. insulto, to spring on]

insult

(ĭn-sŭlt′)
v. in·sulted, in·sulting, in·sults
n. (ĭn′sŭlt′)
a. Medicine A bodily injury, irritation, or trauma.
b. Something that causes injury, irritation, or trauma: "the middle of the Bronx, buffeted and poisoned by the worst environmental insults that urban America can dish out" (William K. Stevens).

in·sult′er n.
in·sult′ing·ly adv.

insult

Medtalk noun Any stressful stimulus which, under normal circumstances, does not affect the host organism, but which may result in morbidity, when it occurs in a background of preexisting compromising conditions

in·sult

(in'sŭlt)
An injury, attack, or trauma.
[LL. insultus, fr L. insulto, to spring on]

insult

Any injury, trauma, poisoning or irritation to the body.

insult

tissue injury or trauma
References in periodicals archive ?
Adding insult to injury, a Dow Jones Newswires story said today that analysts are expecting lower retail sales for October compared to recent months.
Adding insult to injury Tuesday was the way Oakland right-hander Gil Heredia tamed the Angels, shutting them out on four hits until Darin Erstad led off the eighth inning with a booming home run to center field.
Adding insult to injury was the way Oakland right-hander Gil Heredia tamed the Angels.
Adding insult to injury, women not only suffer from blatant discrimination, but if they are salaried, they also do not receive overtime pay, the Complaint alleges.
Adding insult to injury, many of these lifeboats left the sinking ship only partially filled.
In fact, it is the Republicans who are adding insult to injury.
Adding insult to injury, the decision effectively raises the cost of basic service statewide by reducing the number of uncharged directory assistance calls included in basic residential service and totally eliminating uncharged calls for small businesses.
Adding insult to injury in the eyes of the radicals, Johnson vetoed the Civil Rights Bill of 1866, which would have accorded African-American Freedmen with citizenship and voting rights.
Adding insult to injury is the magazine's ``20 Greatest Food Cities'' story by Jonathan Hayes in the same issue, subtitled ``A global guide to the world's culinary capitals.