adaptive peak

adaptive peak

A maximum point (peak) on a fitness (adaptive) landscape, a schematic tool used to visualise the relationship between reproductive success (fitness) and an organism’s phenotype (which is determined by its genotype). Increasing fitness is represented on the landscape as a steeper peak.
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Accordingly a new adaptive peak is achieved and the system enters large scale, low gain.
On the response surface, this argument moves them from the one adaptive peak to the other (Figure 8).
1994; Orr 1995; Orr and Orr 1996; Gavrilets and Hastings 1996) assume that viable genotypes form "clusters" in genotype space so that the population can move from one adaptive peak to another one separated by an adaptive valley following a "ridge" of well-fit genotypes without crossing any deep adaptive valleys.
Wright, in his shifting balance theory (SBT) of evolution, posited that a species becomes stuck on the local equilibrium of an adaptive peak, and can only move to the domain of attraction of a higher peak by the actions of genetic drift followed by subsequent selection (Wright 1931a, 1932; Simpson 1953; Barton and Rouhani 1987, 1993).
In more complex situations, the pattern of mutation may also determine which genotypes are available, and hence which adaptive peak is approached.
Second, a population in the neighborhood of a single adaptive peak will eventually climb the peak regardless of the pattern of genetic (co)variances (Lande 1979; Via and Lande 1985; Zeng 1988), in which case the role of quantitative genetics is only temporary.
This is in contrast to Barton (1992) who argued that even the less adaptive peak can easily take over.
Each of these allows a species to evolve through a valley to a new adaptive peak by a combination of stochastic and deterministic processes.
trials) at each migration rate that shifted entirely to the higher adaptive peak.
Since we expect populations to be centered near an adaptive peak, the common question has been how shifts from one peak to another may occur.
In the classic misuse, however, adaptive peaks are metaphorical places in an abstract "design space," biomechanically defined.
The presence of multiple adaptive peaks in the adaptive surface associated with resistance traits could generate nonindependence if different combinations of resistance were associated with different peaks (e.
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