adaptive behavior scales

a·dap·tive be·hav·ior scales

a behavioral assessment device to quantify the levels of skills of mentally retarded and developmentally delayed people in interacting with the environment; consists of three developmentally related factors: 1) personal self-sufficiency, for example, eating, dressing; 2) community self-sufficiency, for example, shopping, communicating; 3) personal and social responsibility, for example, use of leisure time, job performance. See: intelligence.

a·dap·tive be·hav·ior scales

(ă-dap'tiv bē-hāv'yŏr skālz)
A behavioral assessment device to quantify the levels of skills of mentally retarded and developmentally delayed people in interacting with the environment; consists of three developmentally related factors: 1) personal self-sufficiency, e.g., eating, dressing; 2) community self-sufficiency, e.g., shopping, communicating; and 3) personal and social responsibility, e.g., use of leisure time, job performance.
See: intelligence
References in periodicals archive ?
The participants initially met criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis, but they have since lost all ASD symptoms and diagnosis based on clinical judgment and on assessments in social cognition (face recognition), language, and social interaction as measured on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS).
The primary outcome measures were the Clinical Global Impressions Improvement and Severity Scales (CGI-I and CGI-S); secondary outcomes were the Preschool Language Scale-4, Social Responsiveness Scale, Aberrant Behavior Checklist, and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales.
by using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, 2nd Edition (Vineland-II), to confirm progress in treatment--a function for which the test has not been validated--needed care could be denied to children who could benefit from ABA
All of the children were administered the Mullen Sales of Early Learning and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to assess their cognitive and adaptive development.
That study examined the relationships between ratings on the IAA for students with significant disabilities, corresponding scores on the general assessment, and ratings on two norm-referenced teacher rating scales: the Academic Competence Evaluation Scales (ACES; DiPerna & Elliott, 2000) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS; Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1985).
Greenspan and Switzky recently identified multiple shortcomings of existing adaptive behavior scales, (40) and some forensic evaluators have argued that there is no "gold standard" adaptive functioning measure for use in these cases.
In this case, a recent investigation into adaptive behavior scales and their use today has revealed the lack of a universal or standard definition.
Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale: The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VAB; Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1998) is a semi-structured interview, administered to a parent or other caregiver of the child.
Several analyses were conducted examining the students' adaptive behavior in the areas of communication, socialization, daily living skills, and motor skills as measured by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS).
Figure 3 shows that the mean overall age equivalence on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales was 79.
At intake, 54 participants were assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales.
5 and 58 and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales scores between 38 and 63 at the beginning of treatment were re-evaluated after 4 years of treatment through the Rutgers Autism Program.

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