ad nauseam


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ad nauseam

Etymology: L, ad, to; Gk, nausia, seasickness
to the extent of inducing nausea and vomiting.

ad nauseam

(ad no′zē-ăm) [L. to (sea)sickness]
Of such degree or extent as to produce nausea.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The assertion brought embarrassment for the government which has issued statements ad nauseam against the attacks carried out by American CIA drones from across the Afghan border into the Pakistani tribal areas.
This, added to the new financial year increases in council charges, water bills, fuel and so on ad nauseam puts into perspective the amounts some of our MPs have been claiming as expenses and underlines why I''ll be looking very closely at any candidate who requests my vote.
Indeed, it did not take long for Johnson, 42, to create the impression that perhaps silence is forbidden at the British tracks where he regularly works, as he talked ad nauseam before, during, and after his Churchill races.
The tire reef story out of Florida HASs been reported ad nauseam over every form of media.
Tonight's two hours boils down what you saw unravel in real time last year on the cable-news networks into a lean two hours 7/8 the shots of corpses floating in the sewage-strewn waters, FEMA's confused initial response, ad nauseam.
During the last three years, the well-publicized resurgence of Harlem has been documented ad nauseam.
Soldiers don't have to think about quality performance, the testing has been done ad nauseam and works across a spectrum of operating environments.
Martin repeats, ad nauseam, that he believes in the Canadian Charter, not in natural law morality, not in Catholic teaching, not in what the Church says.
The professor's statements have been summarized ad nauseam by the mainstream media as "comparing World Trade Center victims to Nazis" and taken out of context by biased commentators who assert Churchill is an advocate of terrorism.
More encouraging, Storr departs from the almost complete abdication of intellectual premises that depressingly characterizes so many recent exhibitions of the "festivalist" ilk: Unlike so many lumbering theme shows without actual themes, Storr delivers his thesis clearly and persistently rather than merely wheat-pasting some catchy, fauxsmart slogan over a predictable selection of overly familiar, trendy artists who make the international-exhibition rounds from Venice to Sao Paulo to Pittsburgh to Seoul, ad nauseam.
This is somewhat unsatisfying, since much of this story has already been told, ad nauseam, in the press.