acyanotic

acyanotic

 [a-si″ah-not´ik]
not characterized or accompanied by cyanosis.

a·cy·a·not·ic

(ā'sī-ă-not'ik),
Characterized by absence of cyanosis.

acyanotic

/acy·a·not·ic/ (a-si″ah-not´ik) characterized by absence of cyanosis.

acyanotic

[ā′sī·ənot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, a, not, kyanos, blue
lacking a blue appearance of the skin and mucous membranes. The lack is suggestive of adequate oxygenation. Compare cyanosis.

a·cy·a·not·ic

(ā-sī'ă-not'ik)
Characterized by absence of cyanosis.

a·cy·a·not·ic

(ā-sī'ă-not'ik)
Characterized by absence of cyanosis.

acyanotic (āsī´yənot´ik),

adj refers to the absence of cyanosis, or deficient oxygenation of blood. Typically used in reference to types of congenital heart defects that do not prevent blood from being properly oxygenated by the lungs.

acyanotic

not characterized or accompanied by cyanosis.

acyanotic heart malformations
congenital cardiac malformations which permit life-sustaining levels of activity; includes pulmonary stenosis, aortic stenosis, interatrial septal defect, small ventricular septal defect, dextrocardia and some cases of ectopia cordis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Validation of Novel Scoring Method for Predicting Outcomes after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery This study group from Wayne State University previously validated a novel vasoactive-ventilation-renal (VVR) score as a robust predictor of outcome in acyanotic infants after CHD surgery.
They then discuss septal defects, acyanotic malformations and diseases of the aorta, cyanotic congenital heart disease, univentricular heart, congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries, and other lesions, including Marfan syndrome and primary pulmonary hypertension.
A diagnosis of acyanotic congenital heart disease was made.
On clinical examination, the child was acyanotic and had the typical facies of Williams-Beuren syndrome.
The appearance of cyanosis in a patient who initially was acyanotic and had a left-to-right shunt suggests the development of a markedly increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to significant right-to-left shunting.
Table 1 An Example of a Planning Grid Developed for a Project on Congenital Heart Disease Screen Objective Text Attributes 8 provide Condition Types General layout: Text visual Acyanotic Lesions on left, heart diagram location of with Shunts on right of screen.
Research on the cognitive development of children with cardiopathy has distinguished between cyanotic and acyanotic conditions.
Researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, in a study in the August issue of Pediatrics, reported on neuropsychological effects after surgery for acyanotic heart defects.
He described the clinical and auscultatory findings of 6 acyanotic patients and autopsy finding of a child with ventricular septal defect (1).
This study examined the relationship between congenital heart disease and oxidative stress in children with cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease.