acute acalculous cholecystitis

acute acalculous cholecystitis

A rare but serious condition (up to 50% mortality) affecting approximately 5% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy, in which no stones are present in the inflamed gallbladder.
 
Clinical findings
Fever, right-upper quadrant pain.

Predisposing factors
ICU, long-term TPN, diabetes, pregnancy, sepsis, hepatitis A.

Lab
CBC count, liver function tests, blood culture; bile cultures are negative in half of cases.

Pathogenesis
Uncertain, possibly bile stasis and increased lithogenicity of bile.

Management
Open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) While there is still not much known about the pathophysiology of acute acalculous cholecystitis, it is generally thought of as a disease which effects patients with prolonged hospitalizations who are critically ill.
Acute acalculous cholecystitis associated with gallbladder perforation is often seen with severe infections like pneumonia, viral infections, and with enteric fever where the causative organism Salmonella typhii was identified in bile and are further concentrated in gallbladder (7).
3%) each of acute acalculous cholecystitis and mucocele gallbladder.
He said that Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis, though rare, is most often seen in critically ill people in hospital intensive care units.
The occurrence of acute acalculous cholecystitis during the course of EBV infection is rare but reported, especially in those patients with cholestatic hepatitis [5, 6].
Acute acalculous cholecystitis includes 5% to 10% of all adults with acute cholecystitis but is rarely diagnosed among pediatric patients [1-3].
The objective of the study was to look for the atypical manifestations of DF, with special emphasis to study the incidence and outcome of acute acalculous cholecystitis in patients with DF.
Synchronous presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis and appendicitis: A case report.
Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is acute inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of gallstones.
7%) were reported as acute acalculous cholecystitis.
Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is inflammation of the gallbladder free from calculi, clinically characterized by a state of typical biliary pain, jaundice, and mass in the right hypochondrium, which often is perceived as acute abdominal pain.