needle

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needle

 [ne´d'l]
a sharp instrument used for suturing, for puncturing, or for the guiding of ligatures.
aneurysm needle a blunt-pointed, curved needle with the eye at the point; used for passing ligatures around aneurysms or vessels.
aspirating needle a long, hollow needle for removing fluid from a cavity.
atraumatic needle an eyeless surgical needle with the suture attached to a hollow end.
biopsy needle a hollow needle with an inner needle that detaches tissue for biopsy and brings it to the surface of its lumen; types include the Menghini and Silverman needles. See also needle biopsy.
cataract needle one used in removing a cataract.
discission needle a special form of cataract needle.
fine needle a very thin, highly flexible steel needle with a narrow inner core used to cannulate very small bile ducts to perform transhepatic cholangiography (fine needle transhepatic cholangiography).
Hagedorn's needle a form of flat suture needle.
hypodermic needle a hollow, sharp-pointed needle to be attached to a hypodermic syringe for injection of solutions.
knife needle a slender knife with a needle-like point, used in ophthalmic operations.
ligature needle a long-handled, slender steel needle having an eye in its curved end, used for passing a ligature underneath an artery.
Menghini needle a needle for liver biopsy, not requiring rotation to cut loose the tissue specimen.
Reverdin's needle a surgical needle with an eye that can be opened and closed by means of a slide.
scalp vein needle a short rigid needle with flexible wings on each side; used to infuse IV fluids for short periods of time, in patients with small veins or in children.
Silverman needle a biopsy needle for taking tissue specimens, consisting of an outer cannula and an inner split needle with a longitudinal groove in which tissue is retained when the needle is withdrawn.
skinny needle fine needle.
spatula needle a minute needle with a flat or slightly curved concave surface that does not cut or pierce.
stop needle one with a shoulder that prevents too deep penetration.
swaged needle a needle with no eye, having suture attached to a hollow end.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl),
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract with a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

needle

/nee·dle/ (ne´d'l)
1. a sharp instrument for suturing or puncturing.
2. to puncture or separate with a needle.

aneurysm needle  one with a handle, used in ligating blood vessels.
aspirating needle  a long, hollow needle for removing fluid from a cavity.
cataract needle  one used in removing a cataract.
discission needle  a special form of cataract needle.
hypodermic needle  a short, slender, hollow needle, used in injecting drugs beneath the skin.
stop needle  one with a shoulder that prevents too deep penetration.
transseptal needle  one used to puncture the interatrial septum in transseptal catheterization.

needle

(nēd′l)
n.
1. A slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around an artery.
2. A hollow, slender, sharp-pointed instrument used for injection or aspiration.
v.
To separate tissues by means of one or two needles in the dissection of small parts.

needle

A fine, elongated stainless steel tube with a narrow central bore for injecting and withdrawing fluids.

needle

Medtalk An elongated device with a narrow central bore for injection and withdrawing fluids. See Biopsy needle, Butterfly needle, Colposuspension needle, Extended reach needle, Safe Stepblood-collection needle.

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. A slender, solid, usually sharp-pointed instrument used for puncturing tissues, suturing, or passing a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. A hollow needle used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a vessel or other space.
3. To separate the tissues by means of one or two needles, in the dissection of small parts.
4. To perform discission of a cataract by means of a knife needle.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

needle

surgical device used to puncture tissues
  • hypodermic needle fine hollow tube, with a cutting tip, used to access subdermal tissues; used in conjunction with a syringe to administer fluid agents (e.g. local anaesthetic), collect blood or aspirate fluids

  • suture needle straight or curved needle (round or triangular [reverse cutting or cutting] in cross-section) carrying the suture thread

nee·dle

(nē'dĕl)
1. Slender, usually sharp-pointed instrument used to puncture tissues, suture, or pass a ligature around or through a vessel.
2. Hollow device used for injection, aspiration, biopsy, or to guide introduction of a catheter into a space.
[M.E. nedle, fr. A.S. nāedl]

needle,

n a sharp, metal shaft that is available in a variety of forms for penetrating tissue (e.g., in carrying sutures or injecting solutions).
needle, bevel,
n the slanted part of a needle, which creates a sharp, pointed tip. The bevel of the needle allows for easy penetration of the oral mucosa in dentistry.
needle biopsy,
n the removal of a segment of living tissue for microscopic examination by inserting a hollow needle through the skin or the external surface of an organ or tumor and rotating it within the underlying cellular layers to retrieve a tissue specimen for examination.
needle, gauge of,
n the outside diameter of a needle.
needle, Gillmore,
n.pr an instrument used in a penetration type of test for measuring the setting time of materials such as plaster or stone. A ¼-pound needle is used for determining the initial set, and a 1-pound needle is used for defining the final set.
needle holder,
n a forceps used to hold and pass the needle through the tissue while suturing with a suture forceps.
needle, hub/syringe adaptor,
n the proximal end of a needle, which attaches to the syringe barrel by means of a press-fit mechanism (Luer) or a twist-on mechanism (Luer-lock).
needle, lumen
n the interior diameter of a needle. The lumen, or bore, measurement is variable depending on the thickness of the catheter material. In general, the higher the needle gauge, the smaller the diameter of the lumen.
needle point tracer,
needle, shank,
n the length of a needle as measured from the hub (proximal end) to the bevel (distal end). In the United States, needle shanks are measured in inches and fractions of inches.
needle stick injuries,
n accidental skin punctures resulting from contact with hypodermic syringe needles. Such injuries can be dangerous, particularly if the needle has been used in treatment of a patient with a severe blood-borne infection, such as hepatitis or AIDS. A strict federal protocol for the use and disposal of needles is required for all health care facilities and personnel engaged in direct patient care. The ADA has a policy for dental offices and clinics.
needle, suture,
n a small, sterile, stainless steel implement used during and after surgery to sew stitches into various types of human tissue.
needle, swaged end of
n the opposite end of the sharp tip of a sterile, stainless steel implement, where the thread had been attached directly to it, so that threading is not necessary.
needle, tapered suture,
n the pointed tip of a surgical mending tool.
needle, Vicat,
n.pr an instrument used for measuring setting time by means of a penetration test.

needle

1. a sharp instrument for suturing or puncturing.
2. to puncture or separate with a needle.

acupuncture n's
stainless steel needles with silver-plated handles 0.5 to 1 inch long, which are inserted into tissues at those points on the skin surface which are considered relevant to the problem being treated.
aneurysm needle
one with a handle used in ligating blood vessels.
aspirating needle
a long, hollow needle for removing fluid from a cavity.
aspiration biopsy needle
a needle to which suction can be applied in order to withdraw a core of tissue from a solid organ.
atraumatic needle
surgical needles with suture material fused to the end, which is less traumatic to tissues then suture doubled back through the end of a needle. See swage (2).
blunt-point needle
a noncutting, blunt-pointed needle used in general surgery and for suturing liver and kidney. Needle pricks are less likely. This is an issue in modern surgery on humans.
needle burr
amaranthusspinosus.
needle-cannula
a needle used as a cannula, as for introduction of an intravenous catheter or for passing a suture thread.
cataract needle
one used in removing a cataract.
discission needle
a two-way needle or cannula which permits flushing and aspiration of liquid cataract material. See also discission.
needle driver
see needle holder (below).
needle feeling
the sensation perceived by the operator when the insertion of an acupuncture needle reaches the acupuncture point.
needle grass
Stipa spp. Called also spear grass.
Hagedorn's needle
a form of flat suture needle.
needle holder
a strong scissor-type instrument used to hold a suture needle while pushing it through tissue. The handles are ratcheted and have to be squeezed to release the needle. The face of each blade is grooved so that the needle will not twist or swivel while being driven. The natural action is for a right-handed surgeon.
hypodermic needle
a hollow, sharp-pointed needle to be attached to a hypodermic syringe for injection of solutions.
knife needle
a slender knife with a needle-like point, used in ophthalmic operations.
ligature needle
a long-handled, slender steel needle, having an eye in its curved end, used for passing a ligature underneath an artery.
needle puncture
puncture of a mass, tissue or fluid accumulation in order to relieve pressure or to collect sample for field or laboratory examination.
reverse cutting needle
a curved cutting needle with the cutting edge on the back of the curve rather than on the concave surface.
Rosenthal needle
used for aspiration of bone marrow.
round bodied needle
a noncutting surgical needle used for suturing tissues that separate easily such as intestine, liver, lung and fascia. Called also taperpoints.
spatula needle
a flat, rather than round, special cutting needle for ophthalmic work.
needle stick injury
accidental puncture of the skin by needles while in use or as a result of inappropriate disposal with the risk of introducing infectious agents.
stop needle
one with a shoulder that prevents too deep penetration.
tape needle
a special, heavy duty needle with a palm-fitting handle, for sewing with tape.
tapercut needle
a suture needle with a flattened shaft, so that it is three times as wide as it is thick, and a point which has a gradually diminishing triangular cross-section, a cutting point. Modern design has a circular cross-section and a short cutting tip.

Patient discussion about needle

Q. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles? hi all…I was advised by my practitioner to pressurize on the acupuncture points regularly using needle and it is painless. I am thinking are there any other ways to pressurize or use these points apart from needles?

A. Yes…there are some other techniques available where they can excite the points for the same effect as acupuncture points which may give some additional benefits. Techniques used are moxibustion, essential oils and now even laser biostimulation is gaining popularity.

More discussions about needle