activities of daily living


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Related to activities of daily living: activities of daily living scale, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living

activities of daily living (ADLs),

Everyday routines generally involving functional mobility and personal care, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, and meal preparation. An inability to perform these renders one dependent on others, resulting in a self-care deficit. A major goal of occupational therapy is to enable the client to perform activities of daily living.
See also: instrumental activities of daily living scale.

activities of daily living (ADL)

[aktiv′itēz]
the activities usually performed in the course of a normal day in a person's life, such as eating, toileting, dressing, bathing, or brushing the teeth. The ability to perform ADL may be compromised by a variety of causes, including chronic illnesses and accidents. The limitation may be temporary or permanent; rehabilitation may involve relearning the skills or learning new ways to accomplish ADL. The goal of health care professionals is to promote the greatest degree of independence for the patient. An ADL checklist is often used before discharge from a hospital. If any activities cannot be adequately performed, arrangements are made with an outside agency, health care professionals, or family members to provide the necessary assistance. See also Barthel Index.

ac·tiv·i·ties of daily liv·ing

(ADL) (ak-tiv'i-tēz dā'lē liv'ing)
Everyday routines generally involving functional mobility and personal care, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, and meal preparation. An inability to perform these renders one dependent on others, resulting in a self-care deficit. A major goal of occupational therapy is to enable the client to perform activities of daily living.

activities of daily living

,

ADL

Tasks performed by people in a typical day that allow independent living. Basic activities of daily living (BADL) include feeding, dressing, hygiene, and mobility. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) include more advanced skills such as managing personal finances, using transportation, telephoning, cooking, performing household chores, doing laundry, and shopping.

The ability to perform activities of daily living may be hampered by illness or accident resulting in physical or mental disability. Health care rehabilitation workers play a significant role in teaching people to maintain or relearn these skills so that they can achieve the highest possible degree of independence.

Patient care

The nurse and other members of the rehabilitation team, including occupational and physical therapists, assess the patient's ability to perform ADLs. The rehabilitation team instructs and trains the patient in techniques to relearn the skill, or to accommodate for inability to perform the task. Where appropriate, family members are involved in the rehabilitation program. Referrals to community agencies are arranged when specific tasks cannot be performed independently. See: table

electronic aids to activities of daily living

Abbreviation: EADLs
Computerized or electronic devices that help people with functional limitations gain entry to and exit from buildings, use telephones and other household items, and enjoy leisure activities.

extended activities of daily living

Instrumental activities of daily living.

instrumental activities of daily living

Abbreviation: IADL
Those activities and tasks beyond basic self-care that are necessary for living independently. These activities include communication, mobility, cooking, using the telephone, cleaning the house, doing laundry, shopping, going to the bank, and managing medications.
Synonym: extended activities of daily living See: activities of daily living; self-care
CategoryActivitiesAffecting Factors
Personal careClimbing stairs, moving into and out of chair or bed, feeding oneself, opening containers, dressing, using toilet, maintaining hygiene, taking medicationAltered mobility, physical, mental, or emotional illness, elimination problems
Family responsibilitiesShopping, cooking, doing laundry, cleaning, caring for yard, caring for family and pets, managing moneyAltered mobility, heavy work schedule, insomnia, physical, mental, or emotional illness
Work or schoolFulfilling work responsibilities or school assignments, getting to and from work or schoolAltered mobility, stress, heavy family demands, job dissatisfaction, difficulties in school, physical, mental, or emotional illness
RecreationPursuing hobbies and interests, exercising, reading, watching televisionAltered mobility, physical, mental, or emotional illness
SocializationUsing the telephone, traveling, visiting family and friends, joining group activities, expressing sexualityAltered mobility, physical, mental, or emotional illness, relocation
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment of older people: self-maintaining and instrumental activities of daily living.
Applications now typically contain disqualifying questions that focus on existing loss of activities of daily living, the use of medical equipment and uninsurable conditions.
Standby assistance means the presence of another person within arm's reach to prevent injury while the individual is performing the activities of daily living.
The researchers found that decreased activity in frontal areas of the brain, which are responsible for cognitive processing and decision making, and deep temporal and pariental (back) areas of the brain, which are associated with memory, were associated with greater impairment of instrumental activities of daily living initiall and over time.
In addition, the findings showed that Alzheimer's disease and atypical Parkinson's disease had the greatest impact on all instrumental activities of daily living in the patients who were studied.
Many people are in nursing facilities because they have lost their strength and can no longer perform the activities of daily living or keep themselves sufficiently mobile," says Richards.
Functional decline, as reflected in difficulty performing routine activities of daily living, is common in the nondemented elderly.
George Pressler: "A creative approach toward integration of therapeutic rehabilitation within the context of 'natural' activities of daily living.
Programs in rehabilitation include activities of daily living (ADL's), independent living skills training, vocational rehabilitation, and social skills training.
Nearly 50% of all persons over 70 have at least one chronic illness severe enough to interfere with their activities of daily living.
It enables individuals with impaired mobility to perform activities of daily living such as rising from a chair, walking, and ascending/descending stairs.
Overall, there is a very large need for support with activities of daily living, which are primarily provided by friends or families, suggesting "that the formal infrastructure for such supports, such as organizations and agencies, can adequately service only a small faction of those in need.

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