active treatment


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treatment

 [trēt´ment]
1. the management and care of a patient; see also care.
2. the combating of a disease or disorder; called also therapy.
Schematic of the treatment planning process using occupational therapy as an example. From Pedretti and Early, 2001.
active treatment treatment directed immediately to the cure of the disease or injury.
causal treatment treatment directed against the cause of a disease.
conservative treatment treatment designed to avoid radical medical therapeutic measures or operative procedures.
empiric treatment treatment by means that experience has proved to be beneficial.
expectant treatment treatment directed toward relief of untoward symptoms, leaving the cure of the disease to natural forces.
extraordinary treatment a type of treatment that is usually highly invasive and might be considered burdensome to the patient; the effort to decide what is extraordinary raises numerous ethical questions.
fever treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient with hyperpyrexia caused by nonenvironmental factors. See also fever.
heat exposure treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient overcome by heat due to excessive environmental heat exposure. See also heat stroke.
hypothermia treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as rewarming and surveillance of a patient whose core body temperature is below 35°C. See also hypothermia.
Kenny treatment a treatment formerly used for poliomyelitis, consisting of wrapping of the back and limbs in hot cloths, followed, after pain has subsided, by passive exercise and instruction of the patient in exercise of the muscles. It was named for Sister Elizabeth Kenny, an Australian nurse known for her care of polio patients during the first half of the 20th century.
neurodevelopmental treatment Bobath method.
palliative treatment supportive care.
preventive treatment prophylaxis.
t's and procedures in the omaha system, a term used at the first level of the intervention scheme defined as technical nursing activities directed toward preventing signs and symptoms, identifying risk factors and early signs and symptoms, and decreasing or alleviating signs and symptoms.
treatment and/or procedure a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action prescribed to cure, relieve, control, or prevent a client problem.
prophylactic treatment prophylaxis.
rape-trauma treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of emotional and physical support immediately following a reported rape.
rational treatment that based upon knowledge of disease and the action of the remedies given.
refusal of treatment see under refusal.
root canal treatment root canal therapy.
specific treatment treatment particularly adapted to the special disease being treated.
substance use treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as supportive care of patient/family members with physical and psychosocial problems associated with the use of alcohol or drugs. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: alcohol withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of the patient experiencing sudden cessation of alcohol consumption. See also alcoholism.
substance use treatment: drug withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of a patient experiencing drug detoxification. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: overdose in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as monitoring, treatment, and emotional support of a patient who has ingested prescription or over-the-counter drugs beyond the therapeutic range. See also overdose.
supporting treatment (supportive treatment) supportive care.

ac·tive treat·ment

a therapeutic substance or course intended to ameliorate the basic disease problem, as opposed to supportive or palliative treatment. Compare: causal treatment.

Active Treatment

EBM An arm in a clinical trial in which a medication known to be effective is used, usually as a positive control, and compared to the investigational agent.
Medical history Curative treatment, see there.

ac·tive treat·ment

(aktiv trētmĕnt)
Therapeutic substance or course intended to ameliorate the basic disease problem, as opposed to supportive or palliative treatment.

treatment

management and care of a patient or the combating of disease or disorder.

active treatment
treatment directed immediately to the cure of the disease or injury.
causal treatment
treatment directed against the cause of a disease.
conservative treatment
treatment designed to avoid radical medical therapeutic measures or operative procedures.
empirical treatment
treatment by means that experience has proved to be beneficial.
expectant treatment
treatment directed toward relief of untoward clinical signs, leaving the cure of the disease to natural forces.
palliative treatment
treatment that is designed to relieve pain and distress, but does not attempt a cure.
preventive treatment, prophylactic treatment
that in which the aim is to prevent the occurrence of the disease.
rational treatment
that based upon knowledge of disease and the action of the remedies given.
specific treatment
treatment particularly adapted to the special disease being treated.
supporting treatment
that which is mainly directed to sustaining the strength of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantity or scope:Delivery of stationary multifunctional digital ultrasound system for the Hospital for active treatments - Parvomai Ltd.
Major finding: Nearly half (49%) of the 45 patients receiving active treatment with the device had an apnea-hypopnea index that was lower than 5, compared with 11% of those using the placebo device, for an odds ratio of 7.
All the adverse effects were mild or moderate, and their incidence and severity steadily declined during the 3 years of active treatment.
Writing in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, the experts concluded: "An improved understanding of societal and parental attitudes and perceptions towards either the withholding or the withdrawing of active treatment at the margins of viability is needed.
Boggess suggested that scaling and root planing may have disseminated oral pathogens or their toxins to the rest of the body, accounting for the apparently increased risk of active treatment in this one subgroup of women (Am.
In his active treatment of the space, Geismar could be seen as following up on his earlier work, such as Family, Friends, and Disappointments, 2003, recently shown at the Liljevalchs Konsthall in Stockholm: There, hundreds of photographs mounted on pieces of red wood were hung on long cords hanging down from the wall--personal snapshots from his travels, mostly of people.
When patients, on the basis of reduction in joint pain, were divided into responders and nonresponders, the first 3 months of active treatment (group A) showed a response rate of 31/47 (66%) compared to that of placebo (group B) 18/50 (36%), p < 0.
Those who took a placebo for the first 30 months of this study and then crossed over to active treatment have not done as well as those who have used Copaxone for the full eight years.
That's why investigators use placebos--inert pills or other dummy treatments--and make both study participants and staff unaware of whether a person is receiving an active treatment or not.
The physician would check to see that everything was progressing in a satisfactory manner, but was not expected to provide active treatment or rehabilitation or a cure.
According to the results of a study by the British Thoracic Society, these patients are more likely to receive active treatment.
An active treatment case management model was developed and compared with the model of service delivery used by the involved agency for persons with dual diagnoses at pretreatment and at one, two, and three years of treatment.