active life expectancy

Active Life Expectancy

The average number of years of life remaining in an independent state—i.e., free from significant disability—for a population of individuals, all of age X, all of whom are subject for the rest of their lives to the observed age-specific risks of disability.

active life expectancy

Active life expectancy at age x Epidemiology The average number of yrs of life remaining in an independent state–ie free from significant disability for a population of individuals, all of age x, all of whom are subject for the remainder of their lives to the observed age-specific risks of disability. See Life expectancy.
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The authors said: "Sexually active life expectancy estimation is a new life expectancy tool than can be used for projecting public health and patient needs in the arena of sexual health.
According to the study's results, at the age of 30, men have a sexually active life expectancy of nearly 35 years and for women it's almost 31 years.
While sexually active life expectancy was longer for men, they lost more years of this activity due to poor health than women.
Educational status and active life expectancy among older blacks and whites.
Differentials in active life expectancy in the older population of the United States.
An epidemiological approach to the assessment of output from services for older people lies in the concept of some form of active life expectancy [6].
Healthy active life expectancy (HALE) as an index of effectiveness of health and social services for elderly people.
Organizations that develop methods and models to improve life and active life expectancy for older populations will receive priority in receiving the NIA's life and health expectancy grants.
Socioeconomic status differentials in life and active life expectancy among older adults in Beijing," Disability and Rehabilitation 27(5): 241-251.
Even with the wealth of information available, the issue of whether gains in 'impaired' life expectancy have been greater than gains in active life expectancy has not been resolved.
Surprisingly, healthy active life expectancy receives only a scant mention despite its major importance both conceptually and practically in resolving issues of co-morbidity.
We have therefore suggested [2] that the basic outcome measure for health and social services for older people be Healthy Active Life Expectancy (HALE) calculated for ages 65, 75 and 85.