acrodynia

(redirected from acrodynic erythema)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

acrodynia

 [ak″ro-din´e-ah]
a disease of infancy and early childhood marked by pain and swelling in, and pink coloration of, the fingers and toes and by listlessness, irritability, failure to thrive, profuse perspiration, and sometimes scarlet coloration of the cheeks and tip of the nose. It is due to absorption of mercury. Called also erythredema polyneuropathy and pink disease.

ac·ro·dyn·i·a

(ak-rō-din'ē-ă),
1. Pain in peripheral or acral parts of the body.
2. A syndrome caused almost exclusively in the past by mercury poisoning: in children, characterized by erythema of the limbs, chest, and nose, gastrointestinal symptoms, behavioral changes, and polyneuritis; in adults, characterized by anorexia, photophobia, sweating, and tachycardia. Synonym(s): acrodynic erythema, dermatopolyneuritis, erythredema, Feer disease, pink disease
[acro- + G. odynē, pain]

acrodynia

/ac·ro·dyn·ia/ (-din´e-ah) a disease of early childhood marked by pain and swelling in, and pink coloration of, the fingers and toes and by listlessness, irritability, failure to thrive, profuse perspiration, and sometimes scarlet coloration of the cheeks and tip of the nose. Most cases are toxic neuropathies caused by exposure to mercury.

acrodynia

[ak′rōdin′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, akron + odyne, pain
a disease occurring in infants and young children in which mercury poisoning is strongly implicated as the cause. Symptoms include edema, pruritus, generalized rash, pink coloration of the extremities, scarlet coloration of the cheeks and nose, swollen and painful extremities, cold and clammy skin, profuse sweating, digestive disturbances, photophobia, polyneuritis, extreme irritability alternating with periods of listlessness and apathy, and failure to thrive. Also called erythroderma polyneuropathy, Feer's disease, pink disease, Swift's disease.

acrodynia

(1) Pink disease
A synonym of chronic mercury poisoning.
(2) A term of waning use for pain primarily centred around one or more distal parts—fingers, hands, toes, feet—for which the  term “distal pain” is preferable.

ac·ro·dyn·i·a

(ak'rō-din'ē-ă)
1. Pain in peripheral or acral parts of the body.
2. A syndrome caused almost exclusively by mercury poisoning: in children, characterized by erythema of the extremities, chest, and nose, polyneuritis, and gastrointestinal symptoms; in adults, by anorexia, photophobia, sweating, and tachycardia.
Synonym(s): dermatopolyneuritis, erythredema, erythroedema, Feer disease, pink disease, polyneuropathy (3) , Swift disease.
[acro- + G. odynē, pain]

acrodynia

Pink disease. A now rare, severe childhood illness formerly caused by mercury poisoning from teething powders. Acrodynia features pink, itching extremities, sweating, floppiness, loss of appetite, insomnia and low blood pressure. The disease was also caused by local applications of mercury-containing medication.

Feer,

Emil, Swiss pediatrician, 1864-1955.
Feer disease - pain in peripheral or acral parts of the body; caused almost exclusively by mercury poisoning in children. Synonym(s): acrodynia; pink disease; Swift disease

Selter,

Paul, German pediatrician, 1866-1941.
Selter disease - Synonym(s): acrodynia

acrodynia (a·krō·dīˑ·nē·),

n pediatric disease possibly linked to mercury poisoning. Symptoms include generalized skin rash, pruritus, edema, painful extremities that appear pink, profuse sweating, clammy skin, scarlet-colored cheeks and nose, photophobia, polyneuritis, digestive problems, irritable episodes that alternate with apathetic attitudes, and general failure to thrive. Also called
erythredema polyneuropathy, Feer's disease, pink disease, or
Swift's disease.

ac·ro·dyn·i·a

(ak'rō-din'ē-ă)
Pain in peripheral or acral body parts.
Synonym(s): Feer disease.
[acro- + G. odynē, pain]

acrodynia (ak´rōdī´nēə),

n (erythredema polyneuropathy, Feer's syndrome, pink disease, Swift's syndrome, Selter's disease), a disease that occurs in infants and young children in which manifestations occur with the eruption of the primary teeth. Symptoms include raw-beef hands and feet, superficial sensory loss, photophobia, tachycardia, muscular hypotonia, changes in temperament, stomatitis, periodontitis, and premature loss of teeth. The etiology has been related to mercury and deficiency of vitamin B6 and essential fatty acids. See also erythredema polyneuropathy.

Patient discussion about acrodynia

Q. every alternate day i go through a swift mood change from a very high depression. I am facing some problem and I need help. Every alternate day I go through a swift mood change from a very high depression on one day to a high happiness on the other day. It remains constant for couple of days and then again my mood swings either to a high depression or to a good level happiness. When in happy mood I feel on top. When I feel very depressed I start harming myself and it goes to the extent to bang my head on the wall. Many times I will cry so much that the very next day my eyes burns with irritation and pain. Is all this normal? I think I am getting bipolar.

A. I would suggest going to your doctor and asking to speak to someone. Perhaps start with a theropist so you will have someone to talk to and can teach you to manage your stress. If you are experiencing bipolar episodes the theropist may be able to recognize the symptoms and suggest you see a psychiatrist as well. Try not to self diagnose yourself, tell your doctor that you have been having some hard times and would like someone to talk to and go from there. I wish you well.

More discussions about acrodynia