acrasia


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acrasia

An obsolete term for a lack of self-control; disinhibition.
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On her floating island surrounded by animals she is compared to Circe (54), thus rating her also as a kind of unfallen Acrasia, the fairy temptress analogously owing to Homer who inhabits an enchanted floating isle in Spenser's Book II.
According to Greenblatt's logic, then, Guyon is said to let Acrasia live, because he does not destroy her.
Part D is focussed on acrasia in Plato and Aristotle.
After the Palmer with his "vertuous staffe" transforms them back into men, they still "vnmanly looke" and "stared ghastly," either for "inward shame" or for "wrath" to see Acrasia taken prisoner.
The careful and artificial comfort of the setting--the loam for the grass trucked in, the sprinkler always running--seems to be a kind of affront to the severe landscape surrounding it, a kind of bower of bliss, a paradise of acrasia set in a fierce and fiercely earnest desert.
A popular allegorical figure in the lusty Renaissance (George Chapman's Homeric translation and commentary were echoed everywhere), Circe masqueraded in many different guises: Spenser's Acrasia and Milton's Eve are surely her echoes or doubles, no less than her son Comus.